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FZR 1000 EXUP

Discussion in 'Other Motorcycles' started by dkavanagh, Aug 6, 2019.

  1. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I think #4 just isn't contributing. I think spark must be OK. That leaves fuel and compression. I'm yanking the carbs off in case I missed something on that one. It was plugged up. I worry that it might be compression, bent valve or something. If someone over-rev'd the engine, could happen.
    Anyway, in this picture, the #4 pipe is lower left.
    img_thermal_1566352624147.jpg hmm, lower right? The picture is being rotated left 90 degrees.
     
  2. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I ran the engine at 5000 RPM for 20 seconds or so, then shut the bike down before taking things apart enough to pull the plugs. Here's the state of things:
    Shows #4 is running on the mains, but rich. Anyway, I can make some adjustments to get those more in line. I am pulling the carbs to examine #4 some more to see about that pilot circuit.
     
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  3. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I've gone through my 1st tank of gas. There's a hanging idle, but I expect to sort that out with mixture adjustment and syncing. I was amused about the reserve feature on the bike and it's probably a modern vs old bike thing.
    This bike doesn't have a fuel gauge or normal sender unit. It has a fuel pump and an on-off petcock. How does it handle reserve? It's a little clever. The fuel pump removes the need for a prime setting on the petcock. There is a low fuel sensor in the tank. It sits up about 6 inches off the bottom of the tank. When the fuel gets low enough, the fuel pump is disabled and the bike starts sputtering as the carb bowls get drained. There's a reserve switch I flick and the fuel pump gets re-enabled!
    It bothers me to not have a fuel gauge like my xj550r, but I'm going to use the odometer to get a general sense of when I need to think about fueling up. Got to 145 miles this time before reserve was called for.
     
  4. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I thought I'd post this set of pictures from before I cleaned things out.
    FZR1000-dirty-jets.jpg
     
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  5. Timbox

    Timbox Well-Known Member

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    That pic above is a before? That looks to be very clean IMHO, # 2 might have something in the jet not too sure what it would be, being that clean in the first place. I wish I had carbs that came off and looked that good...if that is a "pre" cleaning pic.
     
  6. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I had some outstanding work, Replace old tires, Install Stainless still braided brake lines, EXUP valve service. I made a video:
     
  7. Franz

    Franz Well-Known Member

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    Were your old lines behind the throttle cables?
     
  8. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    That's a good question, but I do not think so. The lines arc further forward and the brake lines should leave the master cylinder, aiming slightly back, so I think I got it right, finally! I'm sure I have other footage somewhere that would show this.

    Early in the video, I found this, which shows the throttle cables behind the brake lines.
    Screen Shot 2020-06-17 at 8.27.00 AM.jpg
     
  9. Franz

    Franz Well-Known Member

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    I run a bit of rope beside the old lines before l take them off so l get them routed the same way. Just thought they would be better behind the throttle cables. Be some difference with new brake lines.

    Just watching your video again is the longer line on the master cylinder side of the bike, could that be a solution just change them over.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2020
    Minimutly likes this.
  10. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    A little follow-up, I had a heck of a time bleeding the front lines. I ended up bleeding air out of the top of the system by holding a rag around the top banjo bolts and cracking that bolt till the bubbles stopped coming out. Needed my wife's help for this to pump the brake handle.

    Yanked the carbs last night. Need a "deeper" clean than I did last year. Breaking the rack, going into the ultrasonic cleaner. I'll take my time w/ them this time!
     
  11. Timbox

    Timbox Well-Known Member

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    Not too sure the ultrasonic cleaner will do the job you are looking to do. If you brake them all the way down, all rubber out including the throttle shaft seals. You can boil them in soap and water and really get the carb bodies clean. Other than that, just a supper good through cleaning of all the jets and little passages should do the trick.
     
  12. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Thanks, I'll have to boil them when my wife's picking up an extra shift. I ground off the peened back of the throttle screws. Dremel did the trick with a conical grinding stone. I put a bit of wood in the vice and could rest the carb on that to support the shaft when putting pressure on the screw to get it cracked loose. It went well, till #4 and the screws were a little stripped. I got one to move, but one doesn't have enough left to turn with the JIS#2. Toying with grinding a slot.
     
  13. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I have them torn down. I saw some guide online that suggested to remove this plug (They call the "pilot merge cavity bung"). Seems like several passages meet there, so sounds like a nice thing to remove, but not sure I could find a replacement since it's not on the parts diagram. Tempted to leave it since the factory manual doesn't discuss removing it. Thoughts?
    IMG_20201016_211654139.jpg
     
  14. k-moe

    k-moe Pie, Bacon, Bourbon. Moderator Premium Member

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    Leave it.
    It's a very tight press fit. Unless you have experience with making a new plug to the correct tolernaces it's better to leave it be.

    Boiling may be a good idea, but IMO petroleum residue is really only going to be completely removed from tight passages with a petroleum based solvent. Berryman's or the like.
     
  15. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Ultrasonic cleaner: Simple green (several squirts in the water), 50 degree C water, 10 minutes each carb body. I changed the fluid after 2 carbs, it was so dark.
    IMG_20201027_200319687.jpg
     
  16. RangerG

    RangerG Member

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    After rebuilding the carbs on my ‘81 Seca 550 I knew I wanted a fuel injected bike next.
    Current main ride is an ‘08 FZ1. I did one valve check on it a few years ago and it’s due for another one next spring. It has the 20 valve head as well.
    I just took my time and it wasn’t too hard to check and replace shims as needed.
    Hope you get the old girl running properly so you can rack up enough miles to do a valve check.
     
  17. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Thanks, I figure I'll have to get the valve check done eventually. I know it seems like a pain, but it won't be the most time consuming or challenging thing I've done!
     
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  18. dkavanagh

    dkavanagh Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Damn, these carb parts aren't cheap. I'm ordering a couple things from Len as well. Not skipping anything though. Rack is broken and I don't want to have to do that again.
     

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