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HOW TO: Install an aftermarket fuse box

Discussion in 'XJ DIY How-To Instructions' started by Gamuru, Sep 5, 2007.

  1. Gamuru

    Gamuru Guest

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    This is a How-To on replacing the oe fuse box with a more reliable aftermarket ATO-style fuse box. Before we get started, we'll need to collect a few pieces. We'll need a fuse box. I picked mine up from the CARQUEST store where I work. It's a reboxed Littelfuse brand going by the part number 350417BP (.pdf).

    [​IMG]

    In addition, you'll need a couple of mounting screws (8x1"), electrical tape, a couple zip-ties, a box of female insulated spade terminals, and fuses (ATO10 amp x 3 & ATO20 amp x 1). Tools? Phillips Screwdriver and Wire Cutters/Crimpers/Strippers.

    Okay... Ready? Here we go. Let's meet the patient:

    [​IMG]

    My wife's '82 XJ650J Maxim.

    Here are the steps...
    1. Remove Seat.
    2. Remove Right-Hand Access Cover exposing battery.
    3. Disconnect battery.
    4. Unscrew old fuse block.

    [​IMG]

    5. Note fuse sizes and wire colors.

    [​IMG]

    6. Pry open metal wire retainer ring at the base of oe fuse box.

    [​IMG]

    7. Place zip-ties around left- and right-hand wire bundles and unwrap tape.
    8. Cut wires at crimp joints.
    9. Take new fuse box and position it for mounting, making sure all the wires will reach their respective terminals.
    10. Strip wires and install female insulated spade terminals.

    [​IMG]

    11. Tape wires bundles and attach terminals to fuse box.
    12. Using the two #8x1" screws, mount the fuse box.

    [​IMG]

    13. Install fuses and dust cap.

    [​IMG]

    14. Reconnect the battery.
    15. Install side cover and seat.

    That's it. You're done!

    Ed. Note: It occurs to me that if you have a tool caddy you'll want to make sure you allow room for it.

    [​IMG]

    Notice how I've bent the spades a little to make the connections a little more convenient. I still need to label the fuses. From left to right, they're 10A IGNITION, 10A SIGNAL, 10A HEAD L., and 20A MAIN.
     
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  2. Ltdave

    Ltdave Member

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    very clean install!

    i like it. mine isnt as nice looking but its functional...

    d
     
  3. Gamuru

    Gamuru Guest

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    Thanks! I'm off to do my bike now (practiced on the wife's :wink: ).
     
  4. RickCoMatic

    RickCoMatic Active Member

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    Depending on the Model and year of Manufacturer (1983 ~ 1984) 650/750K,MK you might find the Fuse Panel wiring from the Wiring Harness Side has very little wire to try and crimp-on the terminal ends.

    If this is the case ... you will have to solder on some extensions before there is enough wire to reach the new Fuse Panel.

    Be sure to use the same gauge wire if it is necessary to solder on extensions.
     
  5. Bylsma

    Bylsma New Member

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    very nice job, this is actually the first thing i did to my bike and its the only thing on it that looks good. You may want to mention its not a bad idea to get a box with some extra panels in it so in the very least you can store some spare fuses in case of an emergency.
     
  6. crazydad

    crazydad New Member

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    I like it! now i have something more to do to my bike.

    new to this, I like the pic's
     
  7. Gamuru

    Gamuru Guest

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  8. Ass.Fault

    Ass.Fault Active Member

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    Props times two.
    You just keep working away and I will keep on learnin.
    A child could follow these directions they are so well written.:)
    I now have two weekend project to complete due to your direction
    Keep up the good work, I will be watching ;)

    *EDIT*
    Speeding up, Made to 2nd gear :D
     
  9. WesleyJN1975

    WesleyJN1975 Member

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    It looks tremendous! One question though. That fuse box is max rated at 15 amps. One of those fuses is a 20 amp fuse. Can that box handle the 20 amp usage?
     
  10. Gamuru

    Gamuru Guest

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    Good question! If you ask Littelfuse, the answer is no. But, from personal experience, it can. There is no difference between the terminal sizes on a 20 amp fuse holder and a 15 amp fuse holder. I looked at Bussman and Cole Hersee and a few at Radio Shack... They all appear to be the same. I really can't figure our why Littelfuse gave it a 15 amp rating. So, I guess "use at your own risk."

    EDIT: I was think more on this and thought I would add that I wouldn't recommend filling the fusebox full of 20 amp fuses. The heat from five 20 amp fuses would be a bit much. However, in our situation, we're only using one 20 amp fuse followed by three 10 amp fuses. I think we're well within the heat tolerances for this fusebox.
     
  11. IkeO

    IkeO Member

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    im just wondering how you find these blade style fusbox's anywhere let alone radio shack! i spent all day today maybe 4 hours of searching looking for ANY fuse box. no one had them. guess im gonna have to order it online. im getting one for my 750 seca. any thoughts on the proper one to get for that?
     
  12. chacal

    chacal Moderator Moderator Supporting Vendor Premium Member

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    Hey IkeO, I sell these over at:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/Forums/viewtopic ... rt=45.html

    ELECTRICAL SYSTEM PARTS:

    Fuseboxes:


    q) Wirewerks 6-position Enclosed ATC Fusebox (mini push-in blade style)....the one that everyone recommends using. Includes 6 ATC fuses, 2 x 20A and 4 x 10A.

    Size: 4" long x 1-1/8" wide (not including spade terminals) x 1-1/2" tall (including cover). Note that this is a "side-terminal" design...the male spades point outwards away from the sides of the fusebox.

    HCP378BC Wirewerks 6-position ATC style Fusebox:
    $ 13.00 plus shipping


    nnn) Circuit ID Decal for the above wirewerks 6-circuit HCP378BC fusebox. Printed on a clear adhesive backed long-life decal material, this decal specifies (in white print) the circuit "name" (MAIN, HEAD, TURN, IGN.), the fuse amp rating (20A, 10A), and the wire lead color code (RED, R/Y, BRN, R/W) so you can have the same circuit ID info on your replacement fusebox as on your original! Applies to the outside of the HCP378BC clear fusebox cover. The two empty circuit positions are titled "SPARE".

    HCP393 Wirewerks 6-position fusebox ID Decal:
    $ 4.00 plus shipping


    u7) Bottom Gasket for the above wirewerks 6-circuit HCP378BC fusebox. The fusebox has an "open" bottom, which would allow moisture and, eventually, corrosion to get into this otherwise sealed fuseblock. This die cut 1/16" rubber gasket has pre-punched mounting holes.

    HCP382 wirewerks 6-position fusebox Bottom Gasket:
    $ 3.50
     
  13. kooKyGuY

    kooKyGuY Member

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    Has anyone else tried to install the blade style fuse box on an 82 or 83 XJ750 Maxim?
    There is not enough room for it under the seat. The seat rests on it and sits up noticeably to high. I will have to look for something else to do for it. On my previous XJ I just replaced the fuse box with some waterproof inline fuse holders. I will probably do that unless I can find something better.

    I am guessing maybe it could be the corbin seat that causes this on my XJ.
    Does anyone think putting the fusebox on the underside of the airbox cover would cause a problem?

    I have decided to solder some wire on to make them all longer and running the wires to the tool caddy under the back of the seat. Seems like a good place for the fusebox.
     
  14. IkeO

    IkeO Member

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    it may not be the same on my 81 seca but it may help. i actually had to remvoe the plastic (registration paper?) holder underneath the seat which gave me just enough room for clearance to close the seat. if you have one try removing it and see if it closes. with that piece in i coulnt close m seat.
     
  15. kooKyGuY

    kooKyGuY Member

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    It doesn't have that. It is a corbin and doesn't have the original pan on the seat.
     
  16. RickCoMatic

    RickCoMatic Active Member

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    You don't necessarily HAVE to mount the New Fuse Panel on top of the Airbox.
    If you cleverly fabricate a Hard Plastic "Plate" ... there's enough room to have the Battery Rubber Hold-down hold the fabricated "Plate" to the outside of the Battery.

    All you need to do is splice-in some long extensions to the Wiring Harness and bring them down in front of the side of that Battery.

    With the new Fuse Panel mounted to the Hard Plastic Plate ... you just need to make your Pigtails long enough to swing the Plate with the Fuse Panel mounted on it ... out of the way ... when you want to take the Battery out of the Bike.

    I had to do this Mod on a Honda with a Corbin Seat. We "Notched" a tight
    letter "H" Cut into the Plastic Panel and threaded the Battery Tie-down through the H.

    Once you get the Battery Tie-down through the open slit pf the H-cut it stays put ... nice and tight to the Battery and won't move until you release the Tie-down allowing the Plate to be moved out of the way for Battery removal.
     
  17. switch263

    switch263 Member

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    that's a really slick idea rick, thats definitely how i'll be doing mine!
     
  18. blackflagmn

    blackflagmn New Member

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    I don't know if there are any pictures yet of the inline fuse holder option, but I put a couple pics in my gallery of my fuse replacement operation results. It probably would have looked a little nicer if I had some red heatshrink tubing, but I was out, so it had to be green.
     
  19. jgb1503

    jgb1503 Member

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    blackflagmn: what fuse block did you use, and where'd ya get it?
     
  20. blackflagmn

    blackflagmn New Member

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    I picked up 4 of the Mini Inline fuse holders at Checker Auto parts. I cut out the old fuse block and wired the inline fuses in one at a time. When I was done wiring I just zip tied all four inline fuse holders together and then used the holes in the air cleaner cover to zip tie the whole thing onto the cover.

    Just an fyi for anyone doing this project, you need something bigger than a 25w soldering iron to solder wires of this gauge. I struggled for quite a while trying to get the wires to heat up with a 25 watt before I finally borrowed a 40 watt iron, that did the trick just fine.
     
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