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Intake boots

Discussion in 'XJ Technical Chat' started by Oatmeal, May 11, 2022.

  1. Oatmeal

    Oatmeal New Member

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    Getting ready to rebuild the carbs on my 650 Seca and am a little worried about damaging the carb to air box boots as they're over 40yrs old!
    It's been over 30yrs since I last pulled the carbs off.
    Is there some kind of treatment or spray to help soften them up and restore their flexibility?
    I believe that they're actually made of vinyl and I've been googling different ways to accomplish that, but open to any methods you've had luck with.
    Hans
     
  2. jayrodoh

    jayrodoh YimYam Premium Member

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    You can heat them with a heatgun/hairdryer to make them a little easier to remove/reinstall. Soak in hot water before installation works too.

    I've never found anything to "restore" them that worked. Had a rare Kawasaki model that had stiff shrunken intakes that were unobtainable. Tried the wintergreen/rubbing alcohol method among a few other things and nothing brought them back. Took years but I eventually found NOS ones.

    Chacal has new ones for your bike, if they're trashed I've learned its not worth the hassle to fight them and get new. You want a good seal there to avoid sucking dirt into carbs.
     
  3. SQLGuy

    SQLGuy Well-Known Member

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    I replaced the ones on my daughter's Ninja 250 last time I cleaned those carbs, and I was so glad I did. The new ones were dramatically easier to install.
     
  4. Jetfixer

    Jetfixer Well-Known Member

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    Xj4ever has new boots . But you could try soaking in wintergreen oil it will soften them but does not always work .
     
  5. Oatmeal

    Oatmeal New Member

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    I'll give that a try.
    Costs are mounting up quick!
    Throttle shaft seals, fuel pipe o rings and tach drive seal and o ring with shipping came to over $90!
    And there's still more to get.
    Hans
     
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  6. Dan Gardner

    Dan Gardner Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    True dat. Cheap to buy does not mean cheap to maintain. I suppose that's why so many machines of this vintage fall into such severe disrepair in the first place.

    I prefer to think that compared to what some people spend on golf and isht like that, I'm getting by pretty cheap.
     
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  7. Jetfixer

    Jetfixer Well-Known Member

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    Still cheaper than making a payment on a new bike and once running right loads of fun. I did my carbs two years ago and have not touched mine since.
     
  8. Oatmeal

    Oatmeal New Member

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    Lol!
    I'm thinking of buying a new Suzuki GSX 1000GT, but I just love that old 650 Seca!
    I bought it brand new in 1982!
    And when that's done, I still have to put my Ducati back together it's a 2002 ST4S, a sport bike with luggage!
    In the mean time I'll have to be content with riding my Royal Enfield 650 Interceptor....now that's a great bike at a bargain price!
    Hmm, I might have a problem and might need intervention.
    Hans
     
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  9. Oatmeal

    Oatmeal New Member

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    Totally agree, there are worse addictions!
    Hans
     
  10. cgutz

    cgutz Well-Known Member

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    A lot of people buy these vintage bikes for a couple hundred bucks thinking they will get a cheap ride. While cheaper than buying new, I estimate most people put well over a grand getting the bikes up to shape to run safely and reliably, even doing their own labor - this is apart from any cosmetic work.

    In the last 10 years I probably have put $1500 upkeep in my one owner XJ550 which never saw the "weeds," none of that expense is cosmetic, all upkeep - rebuild brakes, valves, tires, gaskets, etc.. The cosmetics are still OEM, and still pretty good for an old bike.
     
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  11. jayrodoh

    jayrodoh YimYam Premium Member

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    Every bike I get costs about $800 to get roadworthy. After that I have a trouble free bike that needs normal maintenance.
     
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  12. Franz

    Franz Well-Known Member

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    It is more fun getting an older bike and getting the tools and parts to put it back on the road, well that's what I prefer to do.
     
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  13. jayrodoh

    jayrodoh YimYam Premium Member

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    I enjoying working on them more than riding at the moment!
     
  14. Oatmeal

    Oatmeal New Member

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    I've owned this bike for over 40yrs (bought it new in '82) and have always meticulously maintained it, but I parked it about 23 yrs ago and pretty much quit riding until I got the itch to start riding again so, I bought a brand new Royal Enfield 650 Interceptor, and not long after that a 2002 Ducati ST4S, but I really miss my Seca!
    I've been collecting parts to get it road worthy and am pretty excited to get going on it, just didn't realize how hard it's getting to find parts for it......just hope I never have to replace that 8" headlamp!
    Anyway, I'm rambling.
    I watched a couple of videos about using winter green oil and alcohol, but the cost of enough winter green oil exceeds the cost of new boots!
    So......ordered these: these https://www.cruzinimage.net/2019/10...buretor-air-cleaner-box-joint-boots-set-4pcs/
    Hans
     
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  15. Jetfixer

    Jetfixer Well-Known Member

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    Most parts are available from xj4ever on the upper right corner of the home page . Great service Chacal responds quick and once you get the hand is ordering it is easy .
     
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  16. Oatmeal

    Oatmeal New Member

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    I have purchased parts for my carbs and tach drive that I couldn't find anywhere else from them, but found these intake boots on the internet.
    They're a parts house in Japan and even with shipping they were a really good deal.
    Like I posted earlier, wintergreen oil is crazy expensive and there's no guarantee it would have made an improvement so I figured this was the best solution.
    Hans
     
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  17. Jetfixer

    Jetfixer Well-Known Member

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    I got my airbox to carb boots from xj4ever have been great . Of course I have not had to mess with my carbs for two years.
     

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