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XJ PARTS CATALOG, SECTION A: INTRODUCTION

Discussion in 'XJ4Ever - Supporting Vendor' started by chacal, Oct 12, 2013.

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  1. chacal

    chacal Moderator Moderator Supporting Vendor Premium Member

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    UPDATED LIST AS OF 10-23-2020:

    Since our last update, we've added quite a few more parts, along with more information and updated application listings.

    And best of all, some new discounts!



    SHIPPING DISCOUNTS:

    - FREE STANDARD SHIPPING {OR JUST $ 10.95 FOR PRIORITY MAIL} SHIPPING IN THE USA FOR ALL ORDERS OVER $200.00 US !!!!


    NOTE: parts available are now listed by the SECTIONS outlined below. Some parts will appear in more than one section, due to the overlap in applications. Hopefully this will make the search for items much easier!

    Each catalog section is a separate message posting, and the section is listed in BOLD RED TYPE at the top of each posting.



    SECTION A:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/xj-parts-catalog-section-a-introduction.44644/

    INTRODUCTION:

    --Yamaha History.

    --Model ID/VIN's.

    --The Real Costs of Maintenance.



    SECTION B:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index...talog-section-b-literature-and-manuals.44643/

    LITERATURE:

    --Service Manuals.

    --Owner's Manuals.

    --Other Literature.



    SECTION C:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/xj-parts-catalog-section-c-fuel-system.44642/

    FUEL SYSTEM ITEMS:

    --Introduction.

    --Hitachi Parts.

    --Mikuni Parts.

    --General Fuel System Tools & Parts.

    --Airbox, Air Filters, Rubber Boots & Parts.

    --Intake Manifolds and Related.

    --Fuel Tanks, Caps, Filters, Fuel Line and Vacuum Lines.

    --Petcocks & Parts.



    SECTION D:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/xj-parts-catalog-section-d-electrical-system.44641/

    ELECTRICAL SYSTEM:

    --Electrical System Tools.

    --Electrical System Wiring. Fuseboxes, Wiring harness components, and related.

    --Charging System. AC Alternator/Generator, Regulator/Rectifier, and related.

    --Ignition System. Ignition Switch, Keys, Pickup Coil, Ignition Coils, TCI-Igniter, Spark Plugs, Plug Caps, Diodes, and related hardware, etc.

    --Starting System. Battery, Battery Cables, Solenoid, Starter Motor, Starter Switch, Relay, and related hardware, etc.

    --Chassis Electrical System. Control Switches, Headlight, Relays, Horns, and related hardware, etc.

    --Chassis Electrical System.: Turn Signals, Side Reflectors, Rear Reflectors, Tail Lights, Brake Lights, License Plate Lights, Lenses, Bulbs, Flashers, and related hardware, etc.

    --Chassis Electrical System. Gauges and related hardware, etc.



    SECTION E:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/xj-parts-catalog-section-e-engine.44640/

    ENGINE PARTS:

    --Engine Gaskets:

    --Oil System Parts.

    --Valvetrain Parts. Valve Gaskets, Valvecover, Valvecover Hardware, Valve Shims, Shim Tools.

    --Valvetrain Parts. Valves, Valve Guides, Valve Springs, Keepers, and Hardware.

    --Valvetrain Parts. Camshafts, Cam Chains, Guides, Tensioners, Tools and Hardware.

    --Engine Mounts.

    --Main and Rod Bearings.

    --Pistons, Piston Rings, and Related.

    --Connecting Rods and Hardware:

    --Cylinders, Cylinder Heads, and Hardware.

    --Oil Pump Engine Cover, Gaskets, and Hardware.

    --Generator Cover, Shifter Cover, Clutch Cover, Gaskets, and Hardware.

    --Starter Clutch System.



    SECTION F:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/xj-parts-catalog-section-f-exhaust-system.44639/

    EXHAUST SYSTEM PARTS:

    --System Overview.

    --Pipes: Headpipes, collectors, mufflers.

    --Systems: Complete exhaust systems.

    --Gaskets.

    --Hardware and Tools.



    SECTION G:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/xj-parts-catalog-section-g-cooling-system.44638/

    COOLING SYSTEM PARTS:

    --Radiator:

    --Fan:

    --Water Pump and Hoses:

    --Coolant:

    --Tools:



    SECTION H:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index...log-section-h-clutch-tranny-drivetrain.44637/

    CLUTCH/TRANSMISSION/DRIVETRAIN:

    --Shifter Foot Pedal and Pads.

    --Shifter Mechanism Parts.

    --Clutch System Parts.

    --Drive Chain & Sprockets.

    --Shaft Drive Parts.



    SECTION J:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/xj-parts-catalog-section-j-brakes.44636/

    BRAKES:

    --Master Cylinders.

    --Disc Brake Calipers and Parts.

    --Disc Brake Pads and Parts.

    --Disc Brake Rotors and Hardware.

    --Rear Brake System Parts.

    --Brake Lines Introduction.

    --Rubber Brake Lines.

    --Braided Stainless Steel Brake Lines.

    --Brake Line Hardware.

    --Brake System Tools.



    SECTION K:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index...alog-section-k-steering-and-suspension.44635/

    STEERING/SUSPENSION:

    --Steering: Handlebars, crowns, head bearings, etc.

    --Front Suspension: Front suspension Overview.

    --Front Suspension: XJ550 - XJ750 Forks, seals, springs, hardware, etc.

    --Front Suspension: XJ900 - XJ1100 Forks, seals, springs, hardware, etc.

    --Front Suspension: Fork Oil and Tools.

    --Rear Suspension: Swingarm parts.

    --Rear Suspension: Shock Absorbers, hardware, etc.



    SECTION L:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/xj-parts-catalog-section-l-axles-wheels-tires.44634/

    WHEELS, AXLES, AND TIRES:

    --Front Wheel Bearings, axles, speedometer drive, and related.

    --Rear Wheel Bearings, axles, and related.

    --Bearing Tools.

    --Wheels & Tires.



    SECTION M:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index...ection-m-control-cable-and-hand-levers.44633/

    CONTROL CABLES & HAND LEVERS:

    --Control Cables.

    --Brake and Clutch Hand Levers.



    SECTION N:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/xj-parts-catalog-section-n-body-and-frame.44632/

    BODY & FRAME:

    --Frame.

    --Front Fairings and Windscreens.

    --Fenders.

    --License Plate Brackets, Frames, and Hardware.

    --Side Covers, Side Cowling, Rear Cowling.

    --Seats, Seat Locks, Hinges, Helmet Locks.

    --Grab Bars, Grab Rails, Standing Handles, and Hardware.

    --Mirrors.

    --Footpegs.

    --Kickstand, Centerstand, and Hardware.



    SECTION O:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index...section-o-emblems-stripes-decals-paint.44631/

    EMBLEMS, STRIPES, DECALS, AND PAINT:

    --Emblems/Nameplates.

    --Stripes and Decals.

    --Paint.



    SECTION P:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/xj-parts-catalog-section-p-the-toolbox.44630/

    THE TOOLBOX:

    --Chemicals, supplies, and general purpose tools.

    --Specialty tools for specific areas of the bike.

    --More specialty tools for specific areas of the bike.



    SECTION Q:

    http://www.xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/xj-parts-catalog-section-q-accessories.44629/

    ACCESSORIES:

    --Bike Covers.

    --Transport.



    As usual, if you have any questions, please write to us via this website's Messaging or “Conversation” system, or e-mail us directly at:

    info@xj4ever.com


    ALSO: on each and every correspondence with us, please tell us what YEAR and MODEL bike you have (example: 1982 XJ650 Maxim) and what your NAME (first name, at least!) is......that information really makes life a bit easier for us, and insures a more timely and ACCURATE response from us back to you!


    Paypal accepted. Worldwide shipping available. Shipping prices and insurance costs are NOT included in the prices of items unless specifically listed. Prices and availability are subject to change. Please write with your list of parts needs and we'll be glad to quote your shipping costs to you.

    We appreciate all of your business, and look forward from hearing from you soon.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2021
  2. chacal

    chacal Moderator Moderator Supporting Vendor Premium Member

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    SECTION A:

    INTRODUCTION:

    -- The History of Yamaha

    We all knew there had to be a reason.......


    IN THE BEGINNING:

    Yamaha is the world's second largest producer of motorcycles, but before making any motorcycles, Yamaha had become the world's largest piano maker, which explains their trademark "tuning forks" logo. So here's their story, which is also the story of your bike, and how it came about to be.

    MR. YAMAHA HIMSELF:

    Yamaha founder Torakusu Yamaha was raised in what is now the Wakayama Prefecture and received an unusual education from his samurai father, a surveyor with broad interests in astronomy and mechanics and a remarkable library. The Meiji Restoration, a government-subsidized effort to hasten the technological growth and development of Japanese society and industry during the late 19th century, put educated people such as Yamaha in a position to capitalize on the new growth.

    At age 20 Yamaha studied watch repair in Nagasaki under a British engineer. He formed his own watchmaking company, but he was unable to stay in business because of a lack of money. He then took a job repairing medical equipment in Osaka after completing an apprenticeship at Japan's first school of Western medicine in Nagasaki.


    As part of his job, Yamaha repaired surgical equipment in Hamamatsu, a small Pacific coastal fishing town. Because of their area's isolation, a township school there asked him in 1887 to repair their prized U.S.-made Mason & Hamlin reed organ. Seeing the instrument's commercial potential in Japan, Yamaha produced his own functional version of the organ within a year and then set up a new business in Hamamatsu to manufacture organs for Japanese primary schools.

    In 1889 he established the Yamaha Organ Manufacturing Company, Japan's first maker of Western musical instruments. At the same time, the government granted Hamamatsu township status, which provided it with rail service and made it a regional commerce center.


    Yamaha Organ used modern mass-production methods, and by 1889 it employed 100 people and produced 250 organs annually.


    During the 1890's the more inexpensive upright piano surpassed the reed organ in popularity in U.S. homes. Yamaha saw the potential of this market. In 1897 he renamed his company Nippon Gakki Co., Ltd., which literally means "Japan musical instruments".

    So the company that we today know as "Yamaha" began life in the music business, first producing organs in 1889. Within ten short years, it had become highly successful in this field and was renamed Nippon Gakki Limited and manufactured a wide range of reed organs and pianos.

    Although building string instruments may seem, at first thought, to be mostly a skill of woodmakers and the like, in a large, integrated manufacturer such as this company became, there are also the machines that form the wood, saw the wood, make the brackets, as well as all of the extensive research into the strong, lightweight metal alloys needed for acoustic pianos.......and all of these metal working, engineering, and other such manufacturing skills were eventually applied directly to the creation of metal motorcycle parts.........but that's a story we're not quite ready to tell.



    FAST FORWARD, 1941:

    Japanese war efforts required the commandeering of all available manufacturing output for the production of wartime materials, most importantly aviation-related products. Nippon Gakki turned its technical, engineering, and associated manufacturing skills towards the successful production of propellers and fuel tanks for aircraft.

    After the war, and the resultant economic hardships in the Japanese economy, there arose a large demand for inexpensive and reliable forms of transportation. Searching around for new markets in which to put their tremendous capabilities and skills to use, in 1953 company president Genichi Kawakami ushered in a new era by speaking these few words: "I want to carry out the trial manufacture of motorcycle engines."

    He had explored and considered using Nippon Gakki's manufacturing resources to produce a range of different products, including sewing machines, auto parts, scooters, three-wheeled utility vehicles, and.....motorcycles.

    At a later date, when asked about this critical decision, he stated, "I had my research division chief and other managers visit leading motorcycle factories around the country. They came back and told me there was still plenty of opportunity, even if we were entering the market late. As I didn't want to be completely unprepared in this unfamiliar business, we toured German factories before setting out to build our first 125cc bike. I joined in this tour around Europe during which my chief engineers learned how to build motorbikes. We did as much research as possible to insure that we could build a bike as good as any out there. Once we had that confidence, we started going."


    A VISIONARY AT THE HELM:

    "If you are going to make anything, make it the very best there is."

    With this thought as their motto, the development team poured all their energies into building the first prototype, and ten months later, in August of 1954, the first model was complete. It was the Yamaha YA-1, powered by an air-cooled, 2-stroke, single-cylinder 125cc engine---basically a copy of the German DKW RT125 model. This bike, also known as the Akatombo (or "Red Dragonfly") of which only 125 units were built, was named in honor of the founder.

    Once finished, it was put through an unprecedented 10,000 km endurance test to ensure that its quality was top-class, as well as winning two of Japan's premier road races of that era, the Mount Fuji Ascent Race and the Asama Volcano Highlands Event.

    Due to the outstanding success of this first-ever model, in January 1955 the Hamakita Factory of the Nippon Gakki Company was built and full production of the YA-1 model began. With confidence in the new direction that Genichi was taking, Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd. was founded on July 1, 1955. Staffed by 274 enthusiastic employees, the new motorcycle manufacturer built about 200 units per month.

    By 1956, a second model was ready for production. This was the YC-1, a 175cc single cylinder two-stroke. In 1957 Yamaha began production of its first 250cc, two-stroke twin cylinder model, the YD-1.

    Based on Genichi's firm belief that a product isn't a product until it can hold it's own around the world, in 1958 Yamaha became the first Japanese maker to venture into the international race arena. The result was an impressive 6th place finish at the Catalina Grand Prix race in the USA.

    Yamaha took quick action to build upon their momentum gained in the USA, and began marketing their motorcycles through an independent distributor in California. In 1958, Cooper Motors began selling the YD-1 250cc and the MF-1 (a 50cc, two-stroke, single cylinder, step-through street bike). Then in 1960, Yamaha International Corporation began selling motorcycles in the USA through its own network of dealers.

    The modern Yamaha Motor Company had begun.


    AN ENGINEERING COMPANY ON 2-STROKE FIRE:

    In 1960, Genichi then turned his attention to the marine industry and began the production of the first Yamaha boats and outboard motors. This was the beginning of an aggressive expansion into these new fields utilizing new engines and FRP (fiberglass reinforced plastic) technologies. The first watercraft model was the CAT-21, followed by the RUN-13 and the P-7 123cc outboard motor.

    In 1963, Yamaha demonstrated its focus on cutting-edge, technological innovations by developing the Autolube System---the separate oil injection system for two-stroke models, eliminating the inconvenience of pre-mixing fuel and oil. Further engineering developments such as torque induction, multi-ported engines, reed valves and power valves kept Yamaha at the forefront of two-stroke engine technology.

    At the same time, Yamaha pioneered the idea of the "over-the-counter" racer bike, which became a reality with the introduction of the TD-1, the first in a long line of 2-stroke race bikes that were the standard for private race teams everywhere. Eventually, rules and competitive pressures changed, but the stage had been set for the introduction of mass-produced racers based on the same technology as the road bikes, and vice-versa.

    Another example of the Genichi's belief in company efforts being focused on the needs of the customer was the Yamaha DT-1. The world's first true off-road motorcycle debuted in 1968 to create an entirely new genre we know today as "trail bikes". The DT-1 made a huge impact on motorcycling in the USA because it was truly dirt worthy. Yamaha definitely "read the flow" of consumer desires when it produced this 250cc, single cylinder, 2-stroke Enduro that put Yamaha On/Off-Road motorcycles on the map in the USA. The DT-1 exemplified the power of original ideas, forward vision, and quick action coupled with keeping in mind the customers' desires.

    And once again, in 1975, Yamaha introduced the very first single-shock, production motocross bikes. This was the beginning of the YZ Monocross machines that changed motocross forever.



    SO FOUR STROKES MUST BE TWICE THE FUN:

    1970: Yamaha's first 4-stroke motorcycle model, the XS-1 (650cc vertical twin) was introduced. A new era begins......

    The XS-1 model was soon re-fashioned into the popular XS650 model, and quickly followed by the XS750 3-cylinder model in 1976. This was Yamaha's first large-displacement 4-stroke engine, and was also note-worthy as the first widely accepted shaft-drive motorcycle from Yamaha. Prior to its introduction, shaft drive motorcycles were associated only with higher-end, solid, dependable machines of limited performance appeal, such as the BMW and Honda Gold Wing designs.

    As always, Yamaha was learning and refining their technologies and skills in order to better serve the developing needs of the marketplace and their customers.

    As gas prices quenched the horsepower battle of the 1970's, the marketplace demanded more refined, mid-level machines that still performed well. Yamaha answered that challenge with the all new XJ series of bikes, which not only incorporated the now-refined shaft-drive technology (on all but the XJ550 models), but also introduced a newly developed and astonishingly narrow in-line four cylinder engine (achieved by moving the alternator from its usual location---at the end of the crankshaft---to above and behind the cylinders and driving it via a secondary, chain-driven shaft). This engine design proved so successful that it remained in production for over twenty years, while other major refinements were introduced in the area of suspension technology (air assistance and anti-dive valving on the front forks) as well as one of the first uses of computer-assisted operations on a motorcycle (although it was mainly a fancy gadget at that time, it was at the start of what obviously became the standard for the future), transistorized electronic ignition, and the recently developed YICS (Yamaha Induction Control System) performance enhancement for their cylinder heads.

    Almost all XJ models incorporated many other desirable performance and safety-related features, such as:

    - Self-canceling turn signals.
    - Air adjustable front forks and rear shock absorber (on some models).
    - Five position rear shocks, with adjustable damping.
    - Lockable forks for security.
    - A security chain (called a Powerlock) which is used to lock the bike to a pole.
    - Trip odometer.
    - A seat and helmet lock.
    - YICS (Yamaha Induction Control System), a performance and fuel-saving engine system.
    - Ignition cut-off safety system that does not allow the engine to be operated under certain conditions (if the kick stand is down, for example).
    - One of the first uses of computerized systems monitoring systems, as introduced on the 1982 XJ750RH Seca models.
    - Four-into-two exhaust design that provides for exceptional performance and acceptable sound levels.


    The XJ-series were perhaps most unique in their consolidation of not only the technical refinements as described above, but also the integration of design and styling aesthetic elements that appealed to a wide population of buyers.....elements that still have strong appeal even today, 25+ years later. Let's take a quick detour and examine why.


    A BRIEF HISTORY OF THAT TIME:

    Most bikes (especially during the 1970's) were produced as street bikes, off-road, or dual-purpose bikes. Euro-style "café racers", touring bikes, low riders (choppers and semi chops) and the like were mostly custom modified versions of street bikes. During the early 70's most of the Japanese bikes (except Hondas) were powered by 2 stroke engines. By the mid-70's, the larger two stroke engines were being replaced with four stroke engines. Suzuki even introduced a bike that was powered by rotary engine! But by the end of the 1970's virtually all the street bikes being produced were 4-stroke, with Yamaha being no exception.

    So by the end of the decade, the entire motorcycle industry was experimenting with giving a particular "style" to some of their newer models. By re-arranging the elements of what would basically be a standard road bike, the manufacturers produced an appearance similar to that of a customized motorcycle.....bringing to the mass marketplace what only the specialized customizers and choppers had been doing for some time.

    Once again, it was this appreciation, understanding, and focus on the wants and need of the customers that fed-back into the entire organization---marketing, engineering, and production operations---that led to the development of these newer (and timeless in their appeal) XJ bikes.

    So, starting with the XJ650H Maxim model (1980), these bikes featured a sloped down, almost "teardrop" style fuel tank, a semi "king-and-queen" styled seat, and thus have a basic shape giving it the appearance similar to that of a cruiser. But this bike was no low rider...the seat is actually as high as what the earlier street bikes had. The handlebars of the Maxim are high enough and wide enough to provide both comfortable riding and exceptional control.

    The Seca models took on more of a sport bike appearance, with flatter handlebars, more scalloped gas tank sides to allow for a more "forward leaning" riding position, and generally a sportier styling and appearance (even though the engine choices, power ratings, and performance were identical to their like-sized Maxim models).

    Model choices soon proliferated around this basic design; the following list briefly summarizes the North American model availability:

    - XJ550 Maxim and Seca models (1981 - 1983). The XJ550 and later FJ600 models are based on a different 4 cylinder, air-cooled inline DOHC powerplant than the larger 650cc-up models, and were never equipped with a shaft-drive system, only with a 6 speed chain drive transmission.

    - XJ650 Maxim (1980-83) and Midnight Maxim (1981) models. Note that all of the Yamaha XJ650, XJ700 non-X, XJ750, and XJ900 models share the same basic air-cooled, inline DOHC four-cylinder shaft drive 5 speed powerplant and driveline.

    - XJ650RJ Seca and XJ650RJC Seca (1982) models. The XJ650RJ Seca model was unique in that the USA versions were equipped with a non-YICS engine and no oil cooler....and were painted silver with blue graphics. The XJ650RJC Canadian versions were painted red, with red graphics, and had the YICS engine as well as a factory oil cooler. Some reports indicate that the red "RJC" model may have been available in the USA in limited quantities, and that it was equipped with the 750cc engine.

    - XJ650 Turbo models (1982 and 1983). One of the very first factory-direct turbocharged models, these plastic-wrapped, full-fairing bikes still look modern today, and preceded the sportbike craze by almost a dozen years or so. While there are very few differences between the 1982 and 1983 models, the 1983 model does have a larger fuel tank, as well as a "power-up" kit that allowed for more boost pressure and subsequent higher horsepower ratings. The vacuum control module that was the main feature of the "power-up" kit was available a retrofit to all 1982 models by Yamaha. 1983 XJ650LK Turbo models are very rare bikes.

    - XJ700 models (1985 and 1986), both in a standard (air-cooled or "airhead") model and an "X" (water-cooled or "waterhead") version, further described below. The XJ700 models were produced as a response to US import tariffs set up to protect domestic (meaning Harley-Davidson) manufacturers from foreign (meaning Japanese) motorcycle sales success during the mid-80's, but those tariffs were soon dropped. Since Canada was obviously not subject to such restrictions, they got both the XJ700-X and XJ750-X models, while the USA dealers only got the 700cc versions, thus limiting the demand for such models. Therefore, XJ700 owners---of both the standard and "X" versions---and XJ750-X owners own a very rare machine and a testament to a part of USA legal history. An incredibly interesting review of the history of this situation can be seen at:

    http://www.maxim-x.com/itc_700cc_tariff_details.html

    The XJ700-X and XJ750-X models have a water-cooled engine with the five-valves-per-cylinder Genesis engine based on the 1984 FZ750 model, but use the same bottom end and drive shaft unit as the other XJ650, XJ700, XJ750, and XJ900 models. The Maxim X was perhaps the fastest of the XJ series, as fast or faster than many sport-bikes of its day. And the XJ750-X models are indeed very rare bikes.

    - XJ750 Maxim and Midnight Maxim (1982-83) models.

    - XJ750 Seca (1981-84) models, although please note that the 1984 XJ750RL Seca is a Canadian- and Australian-only model, which is similar (possibly identical) to the XJ750-F in Europe. It's based on the XJ900, with a slightly different 750 motor than the Seca/Maxim 750 (it uses larger carbs, the airbox from the 900, and the same electronic ignition as the 900). It's so close to the XJ900 that the factory service manual is an XJ900 manual with a short (about 100 pages) addendum for the XJ750RL.

    - XJ900RK Seca model (only available in 1983 in the USA).

    - XJ1100 model (1982-83). The XJ1100 model was really a re-framed and re-named version of the already-popular XS1100 model, and did not use the XJ-series engine. The XJ1100 engine was based on the earlier XS1100 series, also a 4 cylinder, air-cooled inline DOHC shaft drive, and while the engine families are similar, there are some major design differences internally from the 650/700/750/900-based machines.


    Besides the North American models, the rest of the world was also treated to XJ-Fever:

    - the XJ550 model (no Maxim or Seca designation), from 1981 to 1983, which resembles the North American XJ550 Seca models (sans the front fairing). These models came with dual front disc brakes, swirly wheels, an oil cooler and the factory "tail rail", unlike their USA and Canadian cousins. However, in 1984 only, there appears to have been a North-American style XJ550 that was offered in the European and U.K. markets, and it is based on the North American XJ550 Maxim model----meaning, it has only a single front disc brake on the left side, a Maxim style gas tank, and no fuel or volts gauge.

    It should be noted that beginning in 1984, the XJ550 models became known as FJ600 models in the rest of the world, except for the above-referenced European/U.K. models.

    - the XJ650 model (again, no Maxim or Seca designation), from 1980 to 1984, which also resembled the North American XJ650RJ Seca model. These models also came with dual front disc brakes and oil coolers, unlike the USA-Canadian versions.

    - the XJ750 model, (guess what: no Maxim or Seca designation) from 1981 to 1984. As with the XJ650 models above, these bikes came stock with an oil cooler, unlike the North American models.

    - the XJ900 model, which began production in 1983 and remained in production, off and on, in the rest of the world for almost a dozen years, where it was eventually known as the Diversion. As a special note, Yamaha changed the handlebar-mounted fairing to a frame-mounted style in 1984 (and apparently refitted almost 1200 of the 1983 models----free of charge!---because of high-speed handling problems associated with the handlebar-mounted fairings). Also, the engine size was originally 853cc in 1983-84, and then increased to a "truer" 891cc's for the rest of its production life.


    And finally, to throw a little bit of confusion into the mix, we have this:

    - Yamaha also produced a couple of twin-cylinder XS400 bikes using the same Seca and Maxim designations for the North American markets. These bikes are the "younger cousins" of the XJ-series bikes, and are from the related-but-different "XS" series of models. Besides sharing the Maxim and Seca names, they use the XJ-series style engine (DOHC, alternator behind the crankshaft, YICS system). They were chain-driven (5-speed on the Maxim, 6-speed on the Seca models), and featured a unique mono-shock rear suspension system. They were available from 1982-83 in the USA, and lasted until 1984 in Canada.

    But, just to throw the usual Yamaha "twist" into the plot, there was also a 1982 XS400SJ "Special" model that was related to the older XS-series bikes, having the SOHC motor and a more typical dual-shock rear suspension...........

    - Europe and Japan actually got a variety of "real" XJ400 models --- a 4-cylinder, 398cc version based on the XJ550, and the "D" model featured the coolest exhaust pipe configuration this side of XJ Heaven:

    http://xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/21754

    These various XJ400 models were produced off-and-on up until the 2007 model year, and included some versions that looked very much like mini versions of XJ550 Maxim, XJ550 Seca, XJ750 Seca, and even XJ900 models due to the variety of fairings and paint schemes and styling cues used.


    - Similarly, the XJ600---also based originally on the XJ550 model---was produced in 1984-85, but was known as the FJ600 for the North American market. In later years, a new XJ600, with all-new frame and a mono-shock rear suspension system, was marketed as the Seca II in North America and the Diversion elsewhere.

    - Somewhere along the line, Yamaha also introduced the XJR1200 (a chain-driven bike based on the FJ1100 and FJ1200 models) that never made it to North America either. In 2001 that was replaced by the XJR1300 and the FJR1300. Oddly enough, the XJR1300 is the chain drive, and the FJR1300 is the shaft drive, a reversal of the convention used originally in North America.

    - Yamaha produced a few limited variations of their standard models over the years. There were Police versions of the XJ550, XJ650, XJ750, and the XJ900 models. These Police versions were used worldwide, and varied by year, model, and equipment options, in at least the following countries: Abu Dhabi, Algeria, Bahamas, Columbia, Cyprus, Dominica, Dubai, Egypt, Greece, Gabon, Guinea, Hong Kong, India, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Malawi, Malaysia, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Venezuela, Yemen, and Zimbabwe.

    The Japanese market had a fuel-injected XJ750-D model, while an XJ750-A model used the XJ650 Seca frame with the 750cc engine installed.

    There---study and learn the above and you, too, can claim to be a certifiable XJ expert, nutcase, or both!


    AND THEN SUDDENLY, THE MUSIC STOPPED:

    However, not all things were quite as meets the eye, and it is an ironic twist of fate that what actually led to the development and introduction of the XJ-series of bikes also led to their demise.

    The 1980's were actually a very difficult decade for the company.

    In the late 70's/early 80's Yamaha made a conscious marketing and strategic business decision to try and overtake Honda as the largest builder of motorcycles, and that's what actually led to the amazing proliferation in both the number of models and production quantities.

    Kawasaki and Suzuki quickly followed the herd, and soon the world (especially North America, the biggest market) was awash in un-sold motorcycles, and the standard price wars that always follows over-production quickly started.

    It has been noted that by the early 1980's that Yamaha alone had over 1 million unsold bikes in their dealer and factory inventory, and to try and move them out, huge price discounts started appearing......and that started eating into Harley-Davidson sales and profits.

    This is when H-D went to the US Government and got an import tariff and restriction on 700+cc sized bikes. Which wasn't really necessary, since Yamaha had given up on their grand plan by then, and they and others simply slowly bled off the excess inventory via the discontinuance of most models (XJ's included) and no new production in most of 1983 and 1984.

    In fact, soon after the 1985-86 models hit the showroom, H-D had gone back to the US Government and told them that the import restrictions were no longer needed! (and the restriction and tariff was lifted in 1987). Of course, for the USA, it was too late for those dealers to get the larger XJ750-X models........and by then, the consumer rush to the newer style model "sport" bikes and huge cruisers had started, and that was the end of the XJ-series of street-sport-cruiser style bikes.

    So by this era---the mid-to-late 1980's---all manufacturers were styling most of their North American street bikes to fit into one of three basic categories:

    Touring: Large, heavy bikes, with storage trunks, fairings, sound systems, and all sorts of comfort and convenience features----two wheeled "rolling couches".

    Sport: Light, nimble, jack-be-quick race styled bikes, with lots of body shrouding ("plastic"), usually with high-revving, smaller displacement engines.

    Cruisers: Smooth styling, low ride, mellow tuned.


    All the major manufacturers produced some really great touring, sport, and cruising bikes; however, many motorcycle enthusiasts really did not see any of them falling into the category of what was really still desired.......and that being a capable, dependable, good-all-around "road bike".

    The original XJ Seca and Maxim models seem to be some of the last of these "all around" road bikes that were available in the marketplace; that is, they don't really fit into one of the three basic categories above, but these bikes did have their own particular styling that suggested they were on the edge of both the cruising or sport styled categories. Sadly, models such as the XJ Maxim and the Seca did not continue in production anywhere, as the evolving Seca II type style (sport bike) seemed to become the market preference.

    In years directly preceding and following these brilliant XJ-series of bikes, Yamaha continued to grow (and continues to this day). Product-line diversity increased with the addition of products including snowmobiles, race kart engines, generators, scooters, ATVs, personal watercraft and more.

    Genichi Kawakami set the stage for Yamaha Motor Company's success with his vision and philosophies of total honesty towards the customer, making products that hold their own, and which provide an improved lifestyle to people through exceptional quality, high performance products. His history and influence with Yamaha was long and rich. He saw the new corporate headquarters in Cypress, California inaugurated in 1980, and the 25th Anniversary of Yamaha Motor Company become a reality in 1980. He also watched the 20-millionth bike roll off the assembly line in 1982. Genichi passed away on May 25, 2002 yet his vision lives on through the people and products of Yamaha, throughout the world.



    XJ's FOREVER:

    Today, it's no wonder there are riders and collectors that still prefer these classic bikes to anything they have seen produced since. While it is certainly true that these bikes have their share of flaws and faults----electrical system upgrades are a must on these older bikes, as they were barely adequate to begin with----but with some small changes such as upgraded technology and material usage in the brake system, they are one of the finest and most durable examples of the classic sport-cruiser models ever made, and thus retain their desirability, collectability, and value even 25+ years after they were first introduced.

    One owner sums up the XJ Experience with this insight:

    "I just can't believe how much smoother the motor runs compared to my VMX. This old XJ motor is a real jewel. My brother rides a Yamaha FZR and he is very impressed with the smoothness of the XJ. He revs it up a bit at idle and remarks how much smoother it is than his FZR. With the stock pipes, the XJ750 sounds so sweet! It does this throaty 'woom-wooom' sound, and will rev to the moon and back, and it sounds just like music to my ears."

    And so it should be, and perhaps was ordained to be. Yamaha started off almost a hundred years earlier making beautiful music---organs, pianos, and the like---and has never stopped.



    And finally, here’s a true insider’s look at the development of Yamaha motorcycles in this era. Although the particular focus of this article (“From the XS1 to the XJ650: The Foundations of Big Bike Handling”) deals with suspension and handling characteristics, it also gives great insights into other technical developments as well as the engineering “mindset” that drove the overall development of Yamaha bikes:

    https://global.yamaha-motor.com/showroom/yamaha-handling/list/vol04/01.html

    and

    https://global.yamaha-motor.com/showroom/yamaha-handling/list/vol04/02.html


    In fact, there is an entire series of articles on this subject (the above is Volume 4), and each one is very interesting and enlightening. You can start at Volume 1 and progress from there……just like Yamaha did!

    https://global.yamaha-motor.com/showroom/yamaha-handling/list/vol01/01.html
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2020
  3. chacal

    chacal Moderator Moderator Supporting Vendor Premium Member

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    SECTION A:

    INTRODUCTION:

    --Model ID/VIN's



    FRAME AND MODEL AND VIN NUMBERS, OH MY!!!


    Okay, gather 'round friends and prepare yourself, 'cause we're about to go down the rabbit hole......

    It goes without saying that the proper and correct identification of your bike is important for a number of purposes----first and foremost, so that you can order the correct parts for it! But equally important is making sure that your title is correctly identifying your bike for registration, title, and licensing purposes, as well as for insurance registration purposes, etc.

    Our STRONGEST advice is to not rely on the information on your title, bill of sale, insurance documents, state registration certificates, what the former owner claimed, or any other PIECE OF PAPER-----always go "right to the horse's mouth"----or in this case, your bike's frame and engine case, and absolutely verify 100% what bike you actually have! You'd would be quite surprised how many people we come across who are ordering parts, for example, for a 1981 model XJ-whatever because that's what it was sold to them as (or titled as), when in reality they have a 1982 model! YOUR FRAME AND ENGINE CASE ID NUMBERS ALWAYS SPEAKS THE REAL TRUTH! Some typed-up piece of paper from a government or insurance company clerk does not always fall into that same category of certainty!


    ALSO: verify that the engine in your bike is the original engine! Since many of the XJ-series engines are physically interchangable with each other, you never know what's been done over the years as far as engine-swapping is concerned! Rings and pistons from a 650 model engine are NOT going to fit a 750 engine, even if the 750 engine is installed in an XJ650 frame!!! So please---spend the 90 seconds or so necessary to determine whether the engine is original to the bike, and if not, what year/make/model bike that the engine came from. The procedure for doing this is described completely further below.

    And finally, if you take a little bit of study time all of the information below, then soon you, too, can start "code talking" about having a "1982 5N8 model" or a "750MK" and really impress the other guys at the shop with your intimate and devil-is-in-the-details knowledge about all things Yamaha......



    Okay, as is proper with any good training video, we're going to start with the big picture and then work down to the nitty-gritty details.

    So, buckle up, or hunker down, or whatever your favorite metaphor is------because there's going to be a pretty smooth take-off, but then expect some bumps in the road ahead.


    Or, if you’re pressed for time like the rest of us, go here first:

    http://www.dissingermoto.com/



    NUMBERS, NUMBERS-----EVERYWHERE:

    In order to provide a simple basis of communication both internally (between the engineering, sales, production, marketing, and other departments within a company) and also externally (retail dealers, customers, governmental and other outside parties), vehicle manufacturers of all kinds choose to (and are now required to) provide unique "shorthand" codes for each particular unit that they offer for sale. The most commonly used code is what is commonly known as a VIN or Vehicle Identification Number----a sort of "DNA fingerprint" for an individual product. Besides containing a unique serial number for an individual bike, the VIN number also identifies unique characteristics of a bike, such as the manufacturer, the model or "platform" identification, certain optional characteristics, the year of manufacture, etc.

    Before we get down to deciphering a VIN number, let's take a brief step back in time, and recognize that prior to 1981, there was no real set standard for how VIN numbers had to be assigned.....in other words, the VIN Numbers used (by any vehicle manufacturer) prior to 1981 was more-or-less an internal-use number, and could be conjured up in whatever way struck a manufacturer's fancy and served their internal needs.

    Starting in the late 1970's, with the proliferation of manufacturers, vehicle production volumes, and international sales, a solution to the "VIN dilemma" was suggested by the International Standards Organization (outlined in ISO Standard #3779, for the ultra-curious), and this standard was adopted and required to be used by all manufacturers that sold vehicles into the USA by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) as of 1981. This is when the familiar, still-used-today 17-position VIN number came into use, and similar structured VIN formats were also adopted by Canada, the European countries, and many other countries around the world.

    Prior to 1981, manufacturers could use a VIN number length of their choice, and Yamaha was no exception in this regard. In fact, because of the difficulty encountered with implementing this required 1981 changeover, Yamaha (and some other manufacturers) were granted a 9-month "stay of execution" for their 1981 model-year offerings, where they could still use their older (shorter) version VIN numbers to identify their products.

    Thus 1980, 1981, and perhaps even some very early production 1982 model-year bikes use a shorter VIN number that appears on the frame of the bike (more about this later), and may also include a printed paper decal that lists a different (longer) VIN number that is the "extended", 17-position version of the original, shorter VIN number.

    Although for the purposes of absolutely, positively identifying your bike for exactly what it "is", the differences between the shorty VIN and the longer VIN are minor---although since the full 17-position VIN number contains more information, it makes the deciphering process a bit less time-consuming, but rest assured that----armed with the proper information---even a "shorty VIN" can be just as accurately and fully de-coded.



    WHAT'S YOUR NAME, LITTLE XJ, BABY WHAT'S YOUR NAME?:

    Okay, here is how Yamaha VIN's breakdown. We're going to start with the full 17-position VIN, and only later go backwards and look at the shorty VIN's and see how they inter-relate to each other.

    As an example, we're going to play motorcycle manufacturer and we're going to build ourselves a 1981 XJ650 Maxim VIN.

    Here is a standardized 17-position string of letters and characters that we'll use as an example:

    1234567890abcdefg

    Now, we're going to break up that 17-character string into its component bits and pieces, like this:

    123 -45678- -9- -0- -a- -bcdefg

    It's broken up this way because each sub-group of positions (as shown above) has a specific meaning, and here they are:

    The first 3-position field ("123") is known as the WMI, or World Manufacturer Identifier code. For Yamaha, their WMI is "JYA", and thus all Yamaha motorcycle VIN numbers from this era begin with JYA:

    JYA -45678- -9- -0- -a- -bcdefg

    For the curious, the WMI code actually has a specific meaning for each position: the first position identifies the country in which the vehicle was manufactured (J = Japan), the second position identifies the unique manufacturer (Y = Yamaha), and the third position identifies the vehicle type or manufacturing division (A = motorcycle).

    The next 5-position field ("45678") identifies the vehicle characteristics, such a body style, engine type, model, "platform", series, etc. Since Yamaha only identified these bikes by their general MODEL ID CODE, this field is always populated by the 3-position model ID code (5N8, 5G2, 4H7, etc.) followed by two zeros (thus 5N800, 5G200, 4H700, etc.). Although Yamaha could have coded engine size, or paint color, or whatever else they wanted to into those extra two positions, they chose not to, and thus they are always filled with zeros:

    JYA4H700 -9- -0- -a- -bcdefg

    By the way, the "4H7" model ID code is for a USA-destined 1980-81 XJ650 Maxim model, just so you can follow along more easily.

    The next 1-position field---position "9" above---is always a mathematically calculated "check digit" that looks at all other positions of the full VIN number, performs a mathematical formula (multiplying, adding, and then dividing according to a pre-determined routine), and uses the remainder as the check digit. This process insures that transcribing errors and forgery efforts can be identified more easily.

    For our example, we're going to use the number 6 as the check digit:

    JYA4H7006 -0- -a- -bcdefg

    Okay, the next position---the tenth position in the VIN number (designated by the number -0- above) identifies the year of your bike. NOTE: the "year" actually refers to the MODEL YEAR of your bike, and not the year in which it was produced. Since "next year's" models normally are available in dealer showrooms sometime around September of the previous calendar year, the model year of the bike and the calendar year of a bike's production can differ.

    In fact, on the VIN decal on your bike, besides the 17-position VIN number, you will also find the date of the bike production in the format MM/YY, such as 10/80 (meaning October, 1980). A 10/80-built bike would be a 1981 MODEL YEAR vehicle.

    The model YEAR code in the tenth position of the VIN are as follows:

    A = 1980
    B = 1981
    C = 1982
    D = 1983
    E = 1984
    F = 1985
    G = 1986
    and so on......

    Since we've agreed that we're putting together a 1981 model, then of course the tenth position is---from the chart above---the letter "B":

    NOTE: we're going to confuse you now----and it won't be the last time. The year-designation letter codes listed above ONLY PERTAIN TO THE MODEL YEAR CODE USED IN THE VIN.

    There is an alternative way of identifying the year of your bike by the Yamaha marketing "model name" of your bike, and it also uses a letter code for such year-model identification purposes, BUT SUCH MODEL DESIGNATION "NAMES" USE A DIFFERENT LETTER CODE THAN WHAT IS THE VIN "YEAR" IDENTIFIER CODE!

    Okay, deep breath now, keep going, and forget about that last paragraph for now----but, do keep it in mind for later.........

    JYA4H7006B -a- -bcdefg

    The 11th position of a VIN number (-a-) is the location of the ASSEMBLY PLANT where the bike was made. All bikes in this era were produced in Japan, probably at their Iwata City production facility, which was the "A" location. Thus the 11th position of all XJ model bikes will be the letter "A":

    JYA4H7006BA -bcdefg

    And now we're down to the last 6 positions of the full VIN, and this is the unique, sequential "serial number" of each individual bike. Your own bike has a serial number that is different than every other one ever produced for your model and year bike.

    For various reasons, Yamaha assigned a range of serial numbers for each bike year and model, and these numbers did not normally start with the number "000001". The starting point for each serial number differs by year and model. For the 1981 XJ650 Maxim used in this example, the serial number range starts with serial number "100101". Each subsequent 1981 XJ650 Maxim model 4H7 destined for the US marketplace got the next higher serial number, thus the second bike off the assembly line was #100102, etc.

    Let's pretend that this was the 1,356th 1981 XJ650 Maxim destined for the US marketplace. So starting with the 100101 number, we add 1,356 to it, and get: 101456 ( = 1,356 + 100,100). Note that since the first unit of production was #100101, you "start counting" at 100,100 rather than at 100,101.

    So our final VIN for this particular bike is:

    JYA4H7006BA101457

    which, breaking it down into its component, meaningful parts again, is this:

    JYA -4H700- -6- -B- -A- -101457

    Now, with all of the above in mind, we can see from the above 17-position VIN that most of the information that is USEFUL is really just the MODEL ID part (4H700), the year (B), and the unique serial number portion (101457).

    In fact, in the model ID part, since positions 4 and 5 were not used by Yamaha to designate anything at all, and thus are always "00", then really only the model ID part (4H7) contain any useful information:

    4H7---the model identification portion, in this case meaning a 1980 or 1981 XJ650 Maxim.

    B---the model year, in this case 1981.

    101457---the unique production number ("serial number") of this particular bike.



    And Here's Where We Go Backwards:

    From the example above, we see that although a full 17-position VIN number was required of Yamaha (and everyone else) beginning in 1981, all of the useful information contained in the 17-position VIN can just as easily be captured by a "shorty" version of the VIN, just as Yamaha used prior to 1981:

    4H7-101457

    That smaller string of numbers, above, is what was considered a "VIN" number for 1981 and prior years.

    BUT WAIT!, I hear you cry.........where is that useful piece of information called the "YEAR"? (in the full "long VIN", recall that the 10th position uses a letter code to designate the model YEAR, and in our example it's the letter "B", since B = 1981).

    Good question. And here's the good answer:

    Recall this statement from above:

    "For various reasons, Yamaha assigned a range of serial numbers for each bike year and model, and these numbers did not start with the number 000001."

    Well, one of those reasons is that by assigning a defined RANGE of unique serial numbers to each year and model of bike, that unique serial number not only identifies the individual unit of production (thus completely serving the "serial number, DNA-fingerprint" purpose of that number), but also serves as a way of identifying the year of production, too!

    Here, as an example, for the 1980 and 1981 XJ650 Maxim (4H7) models, we have:

    1980: starting serial number of 000101
    1981: starting serial number of 100101

    Thus, if you come across this shorty VIN:

    4H7-021338

    then you know that since the "serial number" is less than the number 100,101 (which is the starting serial number for 1981 models), then it's a 1980 XJ650 Maxim.

    But when you see this shorty VIN, as from our "Build-A-Bike" example above:

    4H7-101457

    then since that serial number is greater than the "100101" starting point for 1981 model year bikes, then you automatically know that it's a 1981 (and not a 1980) "4H7" bike (an XJ650 Maxim).



    And In Confusion, Whoops, I Meant "Conclusion":

    Because the rules changed in 1981, and forced vehicle builders to use a structured, standardized 17-position format for the VIN, the 1980 and 1981 model bikes can have both the long or the short (or both) VIN numbers on the bike. With a little bit of additional information (the serial number range), you can fully "translate" the shorty VIN into the longer 17-position VIN. The longer VIN is standardized, and I suppose that's good; and it also explicitly codes the model year (in the 10th position), which is really the ONLY feature that the shorty VIN does not clearly encode.

    Now, onto the burning questions:


    Where on my bike is this long, or short, or any other VIN's?:

    I don't have the slightest idea.........

    Just kidding. The number(s) are in at least two places, and on most bikes, three locations:

    1) On the right side of the steering "neck" or tube (or "head pipe" as it is sometimes called), you'll find stamped the shorty VIN (1980 and early-1982 models) or the full 17-positions VIN (late-1981 and later years) is stamped, vertically, into the frame tube.

    2) On the left side of the steering "neck" or tube, there will be a white printed decal that will have the full 17-position VIN, along with typical boilerplate "conforms with regulations blah-blah-blah" wording. NOTE: it is on this decal, and only on this decal, that the date of your bike's manufacture is also printed, in a MM/YY format (i.e. 10/81 = October 1981 = a 1982 model year bike).

    Note that for late-1981 year bikes and on, that the full 17-position VIN number appears on both the left-side decal and right-side stamping of the frame's steering neck tube.

    On some later model bikes----primarily late-model XJ900 models----this ID "decal" became a metal plate that was riveted to the right side frame down-tube.

    3) On the engine case, just behind or beside the clutch cover on the right side of the engine, on a small, flat machined pad that faces up (towards the sky). On XJ550 models, this pad is oriented left-to-right on the engine case, while on all other models it is oriented front-to-back.

    What will you find on this pad?

    The "shorty" VIN, as described previously. In our 1981 XJ650 Maxim, example, this flat pad would have this number stamped into it (as long as the engine is the original engine that came with the bike):

    4H7-101457

    Note that it does not matter what year your bike is; even after 1981, the number stamped onto this engine case pad is ALWAYS the "shorty VIN" number, and never the 17-position VIN.

    From our discussion above, it is clear that if the engine in the bike is the original engine, then this number on the engine case will match, exactly, the shorty VIN on the right side of frame neck tube (1980 to early-1981 models), or, working backwards, to the model ID (4H7) and unique serial number (101457) of the longer VIN on 1982-later models.

    Also, in situations where the engine has been replaced, you can actually figure out not only what engine it is (from the shorty VIN stamped onto the engine case), but you can actually work out the actual VIN number of the bike that such engine came from! All you need to know is the model ID codes (listed below), the serial number ranges (also listed below), and from that you can figure out the YEAR of the engine (and thus the bike).......giving you that "missing" bit of information that the full 17-position VIN does explicitly code for.....and then, using the "check digit" computation routine, you can actually calculate the full, complete VIN for the bike that an engine came from!

    Now that's some kinda special party trick, you gotta admit!



    Some Other Semi-Useful Tidbits Of Information About VIN's:

    * In order to avoid visual confusion errors, the letters I, O, and Q are not allowed in any position of a 1981-later VIN.

    * In order to avoid visual confusion errors, the characters U, Z, and 0 (zero) are not used for the model-year designation (the 10th position); however, the letters U and Z and the number 0 can be used in any other positions of the VIN.

    * Although you didn't ask, here is how you calculate the "check digit" that is in position #9 in the VIN:

    A) All letters and characters in the long VIN are assigned a numerical value. Numbers, of course, keep their like-value (i.e. 1 = 1, 5 = 5, etc.) Letters are assigned the numerical values as follows:

    1 = A or J
    2 = B, K, or S
    3 = C, L, or T
    4 = D, M, or U
    5 = E, N, or V
    6 = F or W
    7 = G, P, or X
    8 = H or Y
    9 = R or Z


    B) A multiplication factor is assigned to each VIN character position:

    1st position: x8
    2nd position: x7
    3rd position: x6
    4th position: x5
    5th position: x4
    6th position: x3
    7th position: x2
    8th position: x10
    9th position: unknown, this is what you're trying to figure out!
    10th position: x9
    11th position: x8
    12th position: x7
    13th position: x6
    14th position: x5
    15th position: x4
    16th position: x3
    17th position: x2


    C) Okay, now convert the 17-position VIN to the numerical value as outlined in "A" above:

    JYA4H700?BA101457 (the ? is the check digit we're trying to calculate)

    becomes, from the coding routine in "A" above:

    18148700?21101457

    and multiply each position value by the multiplication factor in "B" above:

    1st position: 1 x8 = 8
    2nd position: 8 x7 = 56
    3rd position: 1 x6 = 6
    4th position: 4 x5 = 20
    5th position: 8 x4 = 32
    6th position: 7 x3 = 21
    7th position: 0 x2 = 0
    8th position: 0 x10 = 0
    9th position: unknown, this is what you're trying to figure out!
    10th position: 2 x9 = 18
    11th position: 1 x8 = 8
    12th position: 1 x7 = 7
    13th position: 0 x6 = 0
    14th position: 1 x5 = 5
    15th position: 4 x4 = 16
    16th position: 5 x3 = 15
    17th position: 7 x2 = 14


    D) Now, add up all those sums from above:

    8 + 56 + 6 + 20 + 32 + 21 + 0 + 0 + 18 + 8 + 7 + 0 + 5 + 16 + 15 + 14 = 226

    Divide the sum (226) by 11 and note what the "remainder" is:

    226 divided by 11 = 20 with a "remainder" of 6.........here, I'd forgotten basic math, too, so here's what a "remainder" is!:

    226 divided by 11 is 20.5455, but the ".5455" part is not important. What IS important is that 11 x 20 = 220, and the "remainder" is 6 (because 220 + 6 is = 226). The "remainder" is the amount "left over" when you are using just whole numbers, no decimal places or fractions allowed.........

    So the check digit for this VIN is 6:

    JYA4H7006BA101457

    By the way, if the calculations for a particular VIN leaves a "remainder" of 10 or more, then the check digit becomes the letter "X".




    NOW MY BRAIN HURTS.........PLEASE STOP!:

    No, you're doing really good!

    And now we're going to get to the devil-details. NOW you're gonna' become a full-fledged XJ Fanatic!

    Here's a review of the YEAR CODES in the 10th position of the full 17-position VIN's:

    A = 1980
    B = 1981
    C = 1982
    D = 1983
    E = 1984
    F = 1985
    G = 1986
    and so on......

    Well, in the time before 1981---when there was no 17-position VIN's, and thus no "year codes" as defined above---Yamaha did have a way to "code" the year model of their bikes. Truth Be Told, they actually had two different ways.

    The first method, we've already reviewed: the "serial number range" method. For the people who had access to, or just flat-out memorized serial number ranges by bike model, this method works fine. Remember this?:

    "For various reasons, Yamaha assigned a range of serial numbers for each bike year and model, and these numbers did not start with the number 000001.

    1980: starting serial number of 000101
    1981: starting serial number of 100101"

    Sure you do.

    Now, since most people weren't about to memorize serial number ranges, a second method was devised by Yamaha to code the year model into an easy-to-understand code.

    In naming their bikes, Yamaha would refer to bikes by their MODEL NAME (i.e. XJ550, XJ650, etc.) and then add a---you guessed it---a LETTER CODE to the end of the model name, as such:

    XJ550H
    XJ750J
    XJ900RK

    Unfortunately, the letter codes used in this manner bear no relation to the letter codes used in the 17-position VIN schemes.

    Here's the Yamaha letter codes:

    A = 1974
    B = 1975
    C = 1976
    D = 1977
    E = 1978
    F = 1979
    G = 1980
    H = 1981
    J = 1982
    K = 1983
    L = 1984
    N = 1985
    S = 1986

    A couple of things to note here:

    a) Prior to 1974, no code was used to designate the model year.

    b) The letter I is skipped from the 1981-1982 sequence.

    c) The letter M is skipped from the 1984-1985 sequence.

    d) The letter O, P, Q, and R are skipped from the 1985-1986 sequence.


    So the Yamaha coding system for identifying a particular bike was the use of the MODEL NAME (XJ550, XJ750, etc.) and then adding a year "suffix" at the end:

    XJ550H is a 1981 XJ550 Maxim (the letter "H" = 1981)
    XJ750J is a 1982 XJ750 Maxim (the letter "J" = 1982)
    XJ900RK is a 1983 XJ900 Seca (the letter "K" = 1983)

    Uh-oh........that last one is a bit confusing (there's two suffixes....R and K).

    Well, to distinguish between a regular Maxim model and a Seca (or other) model, Yamaha also used other suffixes:

    nothing = a regular base model (Maxim is the base model in the USA and Canada)
    R = Seca
    C = could mean Canadian, or could mean California. Nice, huh?
    M = Midnight version of a Maxim, if it's an XJ750, but "L" if it's an XJ650 model, unless, of course, it's a 1982 or 1983 XJ650 model, in which case "L" refers to the Turbo Seca model, and..........
    L = any one of a number of different things....

    I think the best thing we can say is that "perhaps it's better than nothing".

    Perhaps.........

    The key point to remember is the letter codes above refer to the years. Here's the complete list of North-American MODEL NAMES:

    XJ550's:

    XJ550H = 1981 XJ550 Maxim
    XJ550RH = 1981 XJ550 Seca

    XJ550J = 1982 XJ550 Maxim
    XJ550RJ = 1982 XJ550 Seca

    XJ550K = 1983 XJ550 Maxim
    XJ550RK = 1983 XJ550 Seca


    XJ650's:

    XJ650G = 1980 XJ650 Maxim

    XJ650H = 1981 XJ650 Maxim
    XJ650LH = 1981 XJ650 Midnight Maxim

    XJ650J = 1982 XJ650 Maxim
    XJ650RJ = 1982 XJ650 Seca, USA
    XJ650RJC = 1982 XJ650 Seca, Canada
    XJ650LJ = 1982 XJ650 Seca Turbo

    XJ650K = 1983 XJ650 Maxim
    XJ650LK = 1983 XJ650 Seca Turbo

    XJ650L = 1984 XJ650 Maxim


    XJ700's:

    XJ700N = 1985 XJ700 Maxim, 49-state version
    XJ700NC = 1985 XJ700 Maxim, California models
    XJ700XN = 1985 XJ700 Maxim X, 49-state version
    XJ700XNC = 1985 XJ700 Maxim X, California models


    XJ700S = 1986 XJ700 Maxim, 49-state version
    XJ700SC = 1986 XJ700 Maxim, California models
    XJ700XS = 1986 XJ700 Maxim X, 49-state version
    XJ700XSC = 1986 XJ700 Maxim X, California models

    As an aside, I've always secretly admired these 1986 "X" model codes, as the model - year designation (XS and XSC) phonetically sound out the word "excess"......and I'd congratulate Yamaha on such a clever marketing tactic, but alas, it just seems like it was a "luck of the draw" sorta thing.........


    XJ750's:

    XJ750RH = 1981 XJ750 Seca

    XJ750J = 1982 XJ750 Maxim
    XJ750RJ = 1982 XJ750 Seca

    XJ750K = 1983 XJ750 Maxim
    XJ750MK = 1983 XJ750 Midnight Maxim
    XJ750RK = 1983 XJ750 Seca

    XJ750RL = 1984 XJ750 Seca, Canada and Australia only

    XJ750XN = 1985 XJ750 Maxim X, Canada only

    XJ750XS = 1986 XJ750 Maxim X, Canada only


    XJ900's:

    XJ900RK = 1983 XJ900 Seca


    XJ1100's:

    XJ1100J = 1982 XJ1100 Maxim



    BUT WAIT! IF YOU ORDER RIGHT NOW, WE'LL THROW IN A FREE MODEL ID CODES BOOKLET........

    Okay, from the above you can see what the Yamaha coding of the model and year was in their "marketing" descriptions of their bikes.

    But there's another way, too.....the MODEL ID CODE. You've actually already been exposed to it within the VIN section previously; now, let's get serious about these codes!

    The Model ID Codes are just another way of using a short code to substitute for a longer description. In our original example, "4H7" is a shorthand way or expressing 1980 or 1981 XJ650 Maxim model.

    Here's the list of 3-position MODEL ID CODES for North American models. Later, we'll provide a complete list of all the worldwide codes:


    550's:

    1981-83 XJ550 Maxim USA: 5K5
    1981-83 XJ550 Maxim Canada: 5K6

    1981-83 XJ550 Seca USA: 4U8
    1981-83 XJ550 Seca Canada: 4U9



    650's:

    1980-81 XJ650 Maxim USA: 4H7
    1980-81 XJ650 Maxim Canada: 4H8

    1981 XJ650 Midnight Maxim USA: 4W5
    1981 XJ650 Midnight Maxim Canada: 4W6

    1982-83 XJ650 Maxim USA: 5N8
    1982-83 XJ650 Maxim Canada: 5N9

    1982 XJ650RJ Seca USA : 5V2
    1982 XJ650RJ Seca Canada: 5V3 (non-YICS engine)
    1982 XJ650RJC Seca Canada: 15U (YICS engine)

    1982-83 XJ650 Seca Turbo USA : 16G
    1982-83 XJ650 Seca Turbo Canada: 16H



    700's:

    1985 XJ700 Maxim USA: 1FG (49-state version)
    1985 XJ700 Maxim USA: 1JJ (California version)
    1985 XJ700 Maxim Canada: 1FH

    1985 XJ700 Maxim X USA : 1AA (49-state version)
    1985 XJ700 Maxim X USA: 1FJ (California version)


    1986 XJ700 Maxim USA: 1NH (49-state version)
    1986 XJ700 Maxim USA: 1NK (California version)
    1986 XJ700 Maxim Canada: 1NJ

    1986 XJ700 Maxim X USA: 1NW (49-state version)
    1986 XJ700 Maxim X USA: 1LT (California version)



    750's:

    1982 XJ750 Maxim USA: 15R
    1982 XJ750 Maxim Canada: 15T

    1983 XJ750 Maxim USA: 22R
    1983 XJ750 Maxim Canada: 22T

    1983 XJ750 Midnight Maxim USA: 33N
    1983 XJ750 Midnight Maxim Canada: 33U

    1984 XJ750 Midnight Maxim Canada: 22T

    1981-83 XJ750 Seca USA: 5G2
    1981-83 XJ750 Seca Canada: 5H2

    1985 XJ750 Maxim X Canada: 1FL
    1986 XJ750 Maxim X Canada: 1MY



    900's:

    1983 XJ900 Seca USA: 35H
    1983 XJ900 Seca Canada: 31E



    1100's:

    1982 XJ1100 Maxim USA: 10M
    1982 XJ1100 Midnight Maxim Canada: 11G

    1983 XJ1100 Maxim Canada: 11G

    1984 XJ1100 Midnight Maxim Canada: 11G




    Let's see, we can now identify your bike in at least four different ways! Using our original "Build-A-Bike" example from above, we have:

    1) by the shorty VIN: 4H7-101457

    From the chart above, we know that the "4H7" MODEL ID designation is a 1980 or 1981 XJ650 Maxim, and from the serial number (101457), we previously learned that this serial number falls into the 1981 model year range of serial numbers.


    2) By the full VIN: JYA4H7006BA101457

    This identifies it as a XJ650 Maxim (the "4H7" part), and a 1981 model (the letter "B" in the 10th position).


    3) We can call it by the Yamaha MODEL NAME: XJ650H

    Recalling from before, the "H" suffix means it's a 1981 XJ650 model.


    4) By the "STREET-NAME" common usage method:

    "I've got a 1981 XJ650 Maxim".


    Note how all of the following ways of expressing this one bike ARE ALL IDENTICAL:

    1981 XJ650 Maxim
    XJ650H
    4H7-101457
    JYA4H7006BA101457


    Suppose we wanted to tell someone that the Atlanta Braves beat the Denver Rockies by a score of 3-2. We could say:

    "The Braves beat the Rockies 3-2."
    "Atlanta defeats Denver by 3-2."
    "The final score is: The Braves 3, the Rockies 2."
    "The Braves outscored the Rockies by 3-to-2."

    and it all means the same thing.

    The same thought applies to VINs, both long and short versions, and Model Names and Model ID Codes. They all mean the same thing. They all tell the same story. The all communicate the same essential information about your bike: make, model, and year.



    OPERATORS ARE STANDING BY.........:

    There's one other thing you need to know, but don't really want to know (I'm already ducking for cover as I write this......). It muddies the waters, it puts a fly in the ointment, and a monkey-wrench in the works, etc.

    It's sad, but it's true, so here goes:

    Remember way back when, we were talking about the long 17-position VIN, and we referred to positions 4-8 as the vehicle's "characteristics" field:

    "The next 5-position field ("45678") identifies the vehicle characteristics, such a body style, engine type, MODEL, "platform", series, etc. Since Yamaha only identified these era bikes by their general MODEL TYPE, this field is always populated by the 3-position model (5N8, 5G2, 4H7, etc.) followed by two zeros (thus 5N800, 5G200, 4H700, etc.). Although Yamaha could have coded engine size, or paint color, or whatever else they wanted to into those extra two positions, they chose not to, and thus they are always filled with zeros."

    Note that pesky word "platform". It has now come back to haunt us.

    For a car, a "platform" refers to the basic standardized frame or unibody, and as you probably realize, many cars in the same "family" from a manufacturer all share the same basic frame, but with different body features (sheetmetal, trim, interiors, etc.) tacked on to create a different model.

    Well, the same thought kinda-sorta applies to motorcycles, too......and in the two-wheeled word, the "platform" is the basic motorcycle frame.

    The same frame can be used to create any number of different models. For example, think of a Midnight Maxim: it's the same as the standard Maxim model that it's based upon, but with a special paint scheme and other minor feature differences. HOWEVER, from a marketing point of view, it's a different "model", and thus carries a different MODEL NAME and a different MODEL ID code.

    But it's the same frame underneath. And VIN's always carry the FRAME ID CODE within their sequence, rather than the MODEL ID CODE.

    As an example for all those "curiosity kills the cat" type of fellas out there: the XJ750 Midnight Maxim DID (logically) share the same frame with a 1983 XJ750 Maxim but---obviously---not the same model ID:

    1983 XJ750 Maxim = 22R MODEL ID
    1983 XJ750 Midnight Maxim = 33N MODEL ID
    But both bikes share the same FRAME ID = 22R

    This is unlike the differences between, let's say, a 1982 XJ650 Maxim and a 1982 XJ650RJ Seca----although you might think that it's just minor cosmetic and feature differences (different seat, different gauge cluster, slightly different side covers and fuel tank and handlebars and other "bolt-on" items, etc.), in reality, their basic frame and structural components are different. Similar, perhaps, but quite unique: the steering head angle is different, as are the footpeg, sidestand, and engine mount locations and features (super-quick XJ-Factoid detour here: except for the XJ550 Seca models, all other Seca and the XJ650 Turbo model bikes do not use rubber insulators to mount the engine to the frame---as the Maxim models used---thus using the engine as an additional "stressed frame member" for additional frame rigidity.....and, also, as a sometimes added "buzz" and vibration-producing component!). Those two bikes are not only different marketing "models" (and thus use different MODEL NAMES and different MODEL ID Codes), but also use different "platforms" as well......meaning different FRAME ID Codes.

    So let the truth be known, the number that is stamped into the steering neck tube is really the FRAME ID CODE, and not the MODEL ID CODE.

    For most bikes.....meaning 99% of them on the NORTH AMERICAN XJ models.....the Frame ID Code and the Model ID Code are one and the same. It's why this is such a mis-understood and rarely-discussed issue.

    But this distinction occurs very frequently in the "rest-of-the-world" (non-North American) models, and when you review the list of full bike codes below, you'll see these differences quite a bit on those models.

    And now you know why.........



    And one last issue that creeps in, to help make a mess of things, applies mainly to later model bikes (primarily 1988-later, which means it only applies to the XJ900 series of bikes in our beloved XJ-series), although this same issue manifests itself in the entire Yamaha line, and even continues to this day.......and that is, Yamaha apparently felt that they were going to run out of unique 3-position MODEL ID CODES, so they switched to 4-position Model ID Codes (such as the 4BB1, 4BB2, etc. codes that are seen on the 1990-later XJ900 models). HOWEVER, the FRAME ID's continued to be expressed as the same 3-position field as had always been used (example: 1989 XJ900 Model ID Code is a 3NG1, but the Frame ID Code is 58L).

    Many of these type of variations seem to predominate in bikes made for the smaller markets, where some type of non-standardized modifications had to be made to the "standard" version of the bike to meet local laws, primarily for the European markets (since at that time, the EU began trying to standardize the often-varying laws that could be found in differing European countries, some of which still remain to this day.......for example, British headlights must be aimed left-of-center, French bikes are limited in their maximum horsepower ratings, etc.). Thus new Model ID Codes started proliferating to meet such challenges.

    Just another tiny tidbit of information to keep in mind.......!




    THE FULL MONTY:

    Okay, what follows is the whole, fine kettle of fish, with all of the Model ID Codes, Frame ID Codes, frame serial number ranges, and Model Names all rolled into one chart. With this information at hand, you can properly identify your bike (or any other XJ-series bike) that you come across with absolute certainty. PLEASE BE AWARE THAT IN ORDER TO PROPERLY ORDER PARTS FOR YOUR BIKE, IT IS NECESSARY TO KNOW WHICH MODEL YOU ACTUALLY HAVE, AS THERE CAN BE SUBTLE OR MAJOR DIFFERENCES BETWEEN VARIOUS MODELS OF OTHERWISE SIMILAR BIKES!

    Also, please note that certain models, such as the XJ250, XJ400, and XJ500 models, while being very similar to their larger North American "brothers", were never offered in the USA or Canadian marketplace, and therefore are not covered in much (if any) detail in our product listings (and unfortunately we do not have the product interchange information available for those models).

    FINALLY: although many other Yamaha series of bikes from this era, such as the XS-series, XV-series, and others may have used some parts that are interchangeable with the XJ-series models, we generally do NOT have such information available. In many instances, parts that may seem to be "the same" between various model lines may indeed be the same parts, but most times there are small variations in design, fit, or specifications that make such components not suitable for interchange between different series of bikes.



    XJ250 Models

    1984 XJ250 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: GUAM

    MODEL NAME: XJ250L
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ250
    MODEL ID CODE: 49W
    FRAME ID: 5K5
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 200101



    XS400 Models

    NOTE: XS400 models were introduced in the 1976 model year, and up thru the 1981 model year, were truly part of the extensive “XS” series of bikes in both their design (engine, frame) and styling.

    Starting in 1982, the XS400 models adopted the new engine design as in the XJ-series of bikes (narrow, DOHC, 389cc “YICS” engines, with the alternator above the tranny rather than at the end of the crankshaft) and took on the styling cues of the XJ models, also: the XS400 Maxim looks like an XJ550 Maxim (kinda), and the XS400R Seca models looking much like a “baby” XJ750 Seca……but, of course, these are not to be confused with the XJ400 models of this same era --- listed below --- which looked almost identical to the North American XJ550 Seca models (there was a lot of design and style overlap in this era as Yamaha transitioned away from older engineering and styling principles to the “modern” world of the 1980’s…………). These XS400 models use in-line 2-cylinder engines (the XJ400’s are in-line 4-cylinder engines) and the XS400 models lacked the full-cradle frames of the XJ-series bikes, and used a stressed member (no downtubes) frame design.

    All of these 1982-84 XS400 (1984 models in Canada only) models were chain-driven (5-speed tranny on the Maxim, 6-speed on the Seca models), and used a cantilever arm rear suspension featuring a single, centrally-mounted rear shock absorber, rather unique for its time (except for the 1982 XS400S Special model, which retained the traditional dual rear shocks). The Maxim sported 19” wheels on the front and 16” on the rear, while the XS400R Seca models have 18" rims on both the front and the rear.

    The 1982-84 XS400 models, besides sharing the “Maxim” and “Seca” nameplates with the XJ bikes, also share many common parts with the larger XJ-series bikes, but almost none with the XS family line.


    1982 XS400 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: X400J
    STREET NAME: 1982 XS400 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 12R
    FRAME ID: 12R
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: X400RJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XS400 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 16M
    FRAME ID: 16M
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: X400SJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XS400 Special
    MODEL ID CODE: 14V
    FRAME ID: 14V
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    COUNTRY: CANADA
    MODEL NAME: X400J
    STREET NAME: 1982 XS400 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE:
    FRAME ID:
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT:

    MODEL NAME: X400RJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XS400 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE:
    FRAME ID:
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT:

    MODEL NAME: X400SJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XS400 Special
    MODEL ID CODE:
    FRAME ID:
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT:



    1983 XS400 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: X400K
    STREET NAME: 1983 XS400 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 12R
    FRAME ID: 12R
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101

    MODEL NAME: X400RK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XS400 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 16M
    FRAME ID: 16M
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 060101


    COUNTRY: CANADA
    MODEL NAME: X400K
    STREET NAME: 1983 XS400 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE:
    FRAME ID:
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT:

    MODEL NAME: X400RK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XS400 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE:
    FRAME ID:
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT:



    1984 XS400 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: X400L
    STREET NAME: 1984 XS400 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE:
    FRAME ID:
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT:

    MODEL NAME: X400RL
    STREET NAME: 1984 XS400 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE:
    FRAME ID:
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT:



    XJ400 Models

    NOTE: many XJ400 models were styled and equipped almost exactly like the North American XJ550 Seca model, but used the small 400cc YICS engine.

    1980 XJ400 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ400
    STREET NAME: 1980 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE:
    FRAME ID:
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: unknown
    NOTE: the very first "XJ" series bike made, exclusive to the Japanese marketplace, although some probably escaped to New Zealand and Australia. Dual front disc brakes, dual rear shocks. Non-yics 389cc engine.



    1981 XJ400 MODELS:

    NOTES: YICS added to the 389cc engine. The XJ400D version (Japan) has 4 mufflers (two on each side) and a black-painted engine. All but the XJ400 Special model are styled similar to the North American XJ550 Seca models, but came equipped with slotted dual front disc brakes.

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ400
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 4V7
    FRAME ID: 4V7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XJ400
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 5F8
    FRAME ID: 4V7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101


    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ400
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 4G0
    FRAME ID: 4G0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XJ400
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 5M8
    FRAME ID: 4G0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 060101

    MODEL NAME: XJ400H
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 5M9
    FRAME ID: 4G0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 070101

    MODEL NAME: XJ400
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ400 Special
    MODEL ID CODE: 5L8
    FRAME ID: 4G0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 050101
    NOTE: unlike all the other 1981 XJ400 models, this version has the North American XJ550 Maxim fuel tank, handlebars, seating, side covers, "spiral spoke" wheels, single front disc brake, and other components



    1982 XJ400 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ400
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 5M8
    FRAME ID: 4G0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 200101

    MODEL NAME: XJ400
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 5M9
    FRAME ID: 4G0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101



    1983 XJ400 MODELS:

    NOTES: 1983 models received a water-cooled 398cc engine, as opposed to the air-cooled engines used in the 1980-82 model year bikes.

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ400
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 28F
    FRAME ID: 4V7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 210101


    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ400K
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 39N
    FRAME ID: 4G0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 300101

    MODEL NAME: XJ400Z
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 33M
    FRAME ID: 33M
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: this version features a water-cooled, 398cc engine, has a rear mono-shock suspension, rear disc brake, and XJ750 Seca styling and XJ900 style wheels.

    MODEL NAME: XJ400ZS
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 35J
    FRAME ID: 33M
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 025101
    NOTE: this version features a water-cooled, 398cc engine, has a rear mono-shock suspension, rear disc brake, and XJ750 Seca styling, XJ900 style wheels, bikini fairing and a rectangular headlight.


    COUNTRY: OTHER

    MODEL NAME: XJ400P
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 24H
    FRAME ID: 24H
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101



    1984 XJ400 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ400ZE
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 53U
    FRAME ID: 33M
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 080101



    1992 XJ400 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ400S
    STREET NAME: 1992 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 4BP1
    FRAME ID: 4BP
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: known as the Diversion, this is a down-sized version of the 600.


    1993 XJ400 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ400S
    STREET NAME: 1993 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE: 4BP2
    FRAME ID: 4BP
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 025101



    2001 XJ400 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ400R
    STREET NAME: 2001 XJ400
    MODEL ID CODE:
    FRAME ID:
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT:
    NOTE: 4-into-1 exhaust with a canister muffler, Bremo dual-piston calipers with drilled dual front discs. Very retro-looking.



    XJ500 Models

    1981 XJ500 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ500
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ500
    MODEL ID CODE: 5N4
    FRAME ID: 5N4
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    1983 XJ500 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ500
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ500
    MODEL ID CODE: 27E
    FRAME ID: 5N4
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 005101



    XJ550 Models

    NOTE: Although the North American market was treated to two different versions of the XJ550 model (Maxim and Seca versions), the rest of the world generally had only one version available, and that version is most similar to what is known as the XJ550 Seca model in North America. In addition, these "overseas" versions came equipped with dual front disc brakes, swirly wheels, an oil cooler and the factory "tail rail" which unfortunately was never offered on the USA or Canadian versions.

    Although not generally referred to in the overseas markets as "Seca" models (since there was only one model available, there was no need to give it a "name" needed to differentiate it between a base Maxim model), these overseas versions came equipped with the "scalloped" design fuel tank, fuel gauge package, and other special components which are normally found in the North American XJ550 Seca models.

    Also, although the XJ550 "evolved" over time into both the FJ600 and XJ600 bikes in various markets, these bikes---although sharing some features and components with the earlier XJ550 models----are different enough in most components and design to have very limited product or service interchange, and as such, are not listed nor covered by us.


    1981 XJ550 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ550H Maxim
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ550 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 5K5
    FRAME ID: 5K5
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,299.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ550RH Seca
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ550 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 4U8
    FRAME ID: 4U8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,529.00


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ550H Maxim
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ550 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 5K6
    FRAME ID: 5K6
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XJ550RH Seca
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ550 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 4U9
    FRAME ID: 4U9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ550
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ550
    MODEL ID CODE: 4V8
    FRAME ID: 4V8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ550 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes, no fairing, and an oil cooler.


    COUNTRY: GERMANY

    MODEL NAME: XJ550
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ550
    MODEL ID CODE: 4V9
    FRAME ID: 4V9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ550 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes, no fairing, and an oil cooler.


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XJ550RH
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ550
    MODEL ID CODE: 5F9
    FRAME ID: 5F9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ550 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes, no fairing, and an oil cooler.



    1982 XJ550 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ550J
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ550 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 5K5
    FRAME ID: 5K5
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 020101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 1,999.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ550RJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ550 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 4U8
    FRAME ID: 4U8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 020101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,599.00


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ550J
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ550 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 5K6
    FRAME ID: 5K6
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 020101

    MODEL NAME: XJ550RJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ550 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 4U9
    FRAME ID: 4U9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 020101


    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ550
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ550
    MODEL ID CODE: 26Y
    FRAME ID: 4V8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 200101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ550 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes, no fairing, and an oil cooler.


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XJ550RJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ550
    MODEL ID CODE: 5F9
    FRAME ID: 5F9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 020101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ550 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes, no fairing, and an oil cooler.




    1983 XJ550 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ550K
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ550 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 5K5
    FRAME ID: 5K5
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,599.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ550RK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ550 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 4U8
    FRAME ID: 4U8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,699.00


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ550K
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ550 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 5K6
    FRAME ID: 5K6
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 200101

    MODEL NAME: XJ550RK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ550 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 4U9
    FRAME ID: 4U9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 200101


    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ550
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ550
    MODEL ID CODE: 27A
    FRAME ID: 4V8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 300101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ550 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes, no fairing, and an oil cooler.


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XJ550RK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ550
    MODEL ID CODE: 31V
    FRAME ID: 31V
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 001000


    COUNTRY: OTHER

    MODEL NAME: XJ550P
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ550
    MODEL ID CODE: 24J
    FRAME ID: 24J
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100000
    NOTE: this is a Police model.

    View it here:
    http://xjbikes.com/forums/index.php?threads/28181



    1984 XJ550 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ550L
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ550
    MODEL ID CODE: 5K6
    FRAME ID: 5K6
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 200101
    NOTE: styling the same as North American XJ550 Maxim model.




    XJ650 Models

    NOTE: Although the North American market was treated to two major versions of the XJ650 model (Maxim and Seca versions), the rest of the world generally had only one version available, and that version is most similar to what is known as the XJ650RJ Seca model in North America.

    Although not generally referred to in the overseas markets as "Seca" models (since there was only one model available, there was no need to give it a "name" needed to differentiate it between a base Maxim model), these overseas versions came equipped with the dual front disc brakes, "scalloped" design fuel tank, and other special components which are normally found in the North American XJ650RJ and XJ650RJC Seca models.

    NOTE: it has been suggested (but not fully verified) that some late-production 1982 XJ650RJ and RJC Seca model bikes came equipped from the factory with 750 engines (rather than 650 engines). All 750 engines are YICS engines, of course; so if your XJ650RJ/RJC bike has a YICS engine in it, it would be wise to check and make sure that it is indeed a 650 engine rather than a 750 engine......this can be easily determined by looking on the forward side of the cylinder "jugs" casting. Along the centerline of the cylinders, towards the top edge (at the mating surface between top of jugs and bottom of head) will be the engine cc displacement cast into the metal.


    1980 XJ650 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ650G Maxim
    STREET NAME: 1980 XJ650 Maxim-I
    MODEL ID CODE: 4H7
    FRAME ID: 4H7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,749.00


    MODEL NAME: XJ650G Turbo 1
    STREET NAME: 1980 XJ650 Maxim Turbo 1 a/k/a The Forgotten XJ650 Turbo
    MODEL ID CODE: 4H7
    FRAME ID: 4H7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 4,000.00
    NOTE: flat handlebars, bar-end mirrors, single carb, Borg-Warner turbo unit, orange wheels!

    https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/tmi...on-this-bike-i-have-had-for-over-2-t2608.html

    and the following article, which takes a lo-o-o-n-g time to access:

    http://www.xj-forum.de/brochures/Circuit_8_1981_150dpi.pdf


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ650G Maxim
    STREET NAME: 1980 XJ650 Maxim-I
    MODEL ID CODE: 4H8
    FRAME ID: 4H8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ650
    STREET NAME: 1980 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 4K0
    FRAME ID: 4K0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, has dual front disc brakes, an oil cooler, and uses the non-YICS 653cc engine.


    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ650 Special
    STREET NAME: 1980 XJ650 Special
    MODEL ID CODE: 4L6
    FRAME ID: 4L6
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling the same as North American XJ650 Maxim model.



    1981 XJ650 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ650H
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ650 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 4H7
    FRAME ID: 4H7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,899.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ650LH
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ650 Midnight Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 4W5
    FRAME ID: 4W5
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000001
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 3,099.00


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ650H
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ650 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 4H8
    FRAME ID: 4H8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101

    MODEL NAME: XJ650LH
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ650 Midnight Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 4W6
    FRAME ID: 4W6
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000001


    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ650 Special
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ650 Special
    MODEL ID CODE: 10H
    FRAME ID: 4L6
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 050101
    NOTE: styling the same as North American XJ650 Maxim model.


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XJ650H
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 4K1
    FRAME ID: 4K1
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, has dual front disc brakes, an oil cooler, and uses the non-YICS 653cc engine.


    COUNTRY: OTHER

    MODEL NAME: XJ650
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 5K3
    FRAME ID: 5K3
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.



    1982 XJ650 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ650J
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 5N8
    FRAME ID: 5N8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,498.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ650RJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 5V2
    FRAME ID: 5V2
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,899.00
    NOTE: these bikes were painted silver, and did not use a YICS-equipped engine, but instead used the 1980-81 style non-YICS 653cc engine.

    MODEL NAME: XJ650LJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650 Seca Turbo
    MODEL ID CODE: 16G
    FRAME ID: 16G
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 4,399.00
    NOTE: approximately 3500 1982 Turbo models produced (worldwide).
    NOTE: supposedly 8 units were factory-produced painted in a black color scheme rather than the standard crystal silver.
    NOTE: Yamaha certainly had a creative advertising approach for this bike:




    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ650J
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 5N9
    FRAME ID: 5N9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XJ650RJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 5V3
    FRAME ID: 5V3
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: these bikes were always painted quartz silver, and did not use a YICS-equipped engine, but instead used the 1980-81 style non-YICS 653cc engine. Came with a factory-installed oil cooler.

    MODEL NAME: XJ650RJC
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650 Seca Canadian
    MODEL ID CODE: 15U
    FRAME ID: 15U
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: these bikes were painted silver or red, had a YICS-equipped 653cc engine, and were released in September 1981 (at the earliest). Came with a factory-installed oil cooler.

    MODEL NAME: XJ650LJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650 Seca Turbo
    MODEL ID CODE: 16H
    FRAME ID: 16H
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: approximately 3500 1982 Turbo models produced (worldwide).


    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ650
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 11N
    FRAME ID: 4K0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 055101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler. UK model.

    MODEL NAME: XJ650
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 11T
    FRAME ID: 11T
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.


    COUNTRY: GERMANY

    MODEL NAME: XJ650
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 11R
    FRAME ID: 4K0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 050101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.


    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ650
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 16F
    FRAME ID: 4L6
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 060101

    MODEL NAME: XJ650LJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650 Seca Turbo
    MODEL ID CODE: 17Y
    FRAME ID: 17Y
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: approximately 3500 1982 Turbo models produced (worldwide).
    NOTE: some sources seem to believe that the Turbo was a 1981 model:
    www.xj650.de/dokumentation_17.htm


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XJ650RJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 14R
    FRAME ID: 14R
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, has dual front disc brakes, an oil cooler, and uses a YICS-equipped engine

    MODEL NAME: XJ650LJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ650 Seca Turbo
    MODEL ID CODE: 17Y
    FRAME ID: 17Y
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: approximately 3500 1982 Turbo models produced (worldwide).



    1983 XJ650 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ650K
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ650 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 5N8
    FRAME ID: 5N8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 050101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,999.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ650LK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ650 Seca Turbo
    MODEL ID CODE: 16G
    FRAME ID: 16G
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 4,999.00
    NOTE: approximately 1500 1983 Turbo models produced (worldwide).


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ650K
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ650 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 5N9
    FRAME ID: 5N9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 050101

    MODEL NAME: XJ650RK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ650 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 20F
    FRAME ID: 20F
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XJ650LK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ650 Seca Turbo
    MODEL ID CODE: 16H
    FRAME ID: 16H
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 050101
    NOTE: approximately 1500 1983 Turbo models produced (worldwide).


    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ650
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 27F
    FRAME ID: 4K0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 070101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.

    MODEL NAME: XJ650
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 27G
    FRAME ID: 4K0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 200101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.

    MODEL NAME: XJ650
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 30K
    FRAME ID: 4K0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 300101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler. Sold in Switzerland only.


    COUNTRY: OTHER

    MODEL NAME: XJ650K
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ650
    MODEL ID CODE: 30U
    FRAME ID: 30U
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.




    1984 XJ650 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ650L
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ650 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 5N9
    FRAME ID: 5N9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101



    1985 XJ650 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ650POLICE
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ650 Police Special
    MODEL ID CODE: 1FF
    FRAME ID: 37G
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 002101
    NOTE: for the Spanish market.



    1988 XJ650 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: OTHER

    MODEL NAME: XJ650P88
    STREET NAME: 1988 XJ650 Police Special
    MODEL ID CODE: 37G
    FRAME ID: 37G
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: for the Hong Kong and Asian markets.



    XJ700 Models

    NOTE: The North American market was treated to two different versions of the "XJ700" models; the USA only received the smaller 700cc version of these bikes (due to the “Harley Tariff” on bikes 750cc or larger), while the Canadian market received both the XJ700cc and XJ750cc-engine versions. In addition, these bikes were produced in both a standard air-cooled version, and in a high-performance "Maxim-X" series that featured the 5-valves per cylinder "Genesis" engine, and these "X" models also featured a water-cooled engine block system.

    Rumor has it that not all of the XJ700 air-cooled models were able to be sold in the USA, and that a good number of them were re-exported (new) to the European market for re-sale sometime in the late 80’s…..

    Besides the engine-size and type differences, both the USA or Canadian versions are basically identical in design and features. The XJ750-engine versions of this bike (Canadian-only) are listed further below in the "XJ750 Models" section. ALL of the water-cooled, XJ750-engine versions of this "XJ700" style bike were the water-cooled versions and were "Maxim-X" models.


    1985 XJ700 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ700N
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ700 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 1FG
    FRAME ID: 1FG
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,899.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ700NC
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ700 Maxim California
    MODEL ID CODE: 1JJ
    FRAME ID: 1JJ
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,999.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ700XN
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ700 Maxim-X
    MODEL ID CODE: 1AA
    FRAME ID: 1AA
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 3,499.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ700XNC
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ700 Maxim-X, California
    MODEL ID CODE: 1FJ
    FRAME ID: 1FJ
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 3,699.00


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ700N Maxim
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ700 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 1FH
    FRAME ID: 1FH
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101



    1986 XJ700 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ700S
    STREET NAME: 1986 XJ700 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 1NH
    FRAME ID: 1NH
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 3,059.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ700SC
    STREET NAME: 1986 XJ700 Maxim-X, California
    MODEL ID CODE: 1NK
    FRAME ID: 1NKJ
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 3,099.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ700XS
    STREET NAME: 1986 XJ700 Maxim-X
    MODEL ID CODE: 1NW
    FRAME ID: 1NW
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 3,799.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ700XSC
    STREET NAME: 1986 XJ700 Maxim-X, California
    MODEL ID CODE: 1LT
    FRAME ID: 1LT
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 3,899.00


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ700S Maxim
    STREET NAME: 1986 XJ700 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 1NJ
    FRAME ID: 1NJ
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2021
  4. chacal

    chacal Moderator Moderator Supporting Vendor Premium Member

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    XJ750 Models

    NOTE: Although the North American market was treated to three different versions of the XJ750 model (Maxim/Midnight Maxim, Seca, and the previously mentioned XJ750 Maxim-X versions), the rest of the world generally had only one version available, and that version is most similar to what is known as the XJ750 Seca model in North America.

    Although not generally referred to in the overseas markets as a "Seca" model (since there was only one model available, there was no need to give it a "name" needed to differentiate it between a base Maxim model), these overseas versions came equipped with the "scalloped" design fuel tank, gauge package, and other special components which are normally found in the North American XJ750 Seca models.


    1981 XJ750 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ750RH
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ750 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 5G2
    FRAME ID: 5G2
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 3,150.00


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ750RH
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ750 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 5H2
    FRAME ID: 5H2
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    COUNTRY: UNITED KINGDOM

    MODEL NAME: XJ750
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 5N1
    FRAME ID: 5N1
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ750 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.


    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ750A
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 5G8
    FRAME ID: 5G8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ750 Seca model, and some versions may have been equipped with an oil cooler.

    MODEL NAME: XJ750E
    STREET NAME: 1981 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 5G9
    FRAME ID: 5G8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 010101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ650RJ Seca model, and fitted with the 750cc engine. Unlike the RJ models, these feature air-assisted front forks.



    1982 XJ750 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ750J
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ750 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 15R
    FRAME ID: 15R
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,999.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ750RJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ750 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 5G2
    FRAME ID: 5G2
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 2,899.00


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ750J
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ750 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 15T
    FRAME ID: 15T
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XJ750RJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ750 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 5H2
    FRAME ID: 5H2
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101


    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ750
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 11M
    FRAME ID: 11M
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ750 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.


    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ750D
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 22N
    FRAME ID: 5G8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 020101
    NOTE: this model features fuel injection and the same style appearance, bodywork, and wheels as the XJ650 Turbo models. Unique digital dash “Yamaha Cycle Communications System”. Front forks featured the XJ900 style anti-dive system. Here's one:



    COUNTRY: OE

    MODEL NAME: XJ750
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 5N1
    FRAME ID: 5N1
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 003101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ750 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.



    1983 XJ750 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ750K
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 22R
    FRAME ID: 22R
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 3,299.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ750MK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750 Midnight Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 33N
    FRAME ID: 22R
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 3,599.00

    MODEL NAME: XJ750RK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 5G2
    FRAME ID: 5G2
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 150101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 4,099.00


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ750K
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 22T
    FRAME ID: 22T
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XJ750MK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750 Midnight Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 33U
    FRAME ID: 22T
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101

    MODEL NAME: XJ750RK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 5H2
    FRAME ID: 5H2
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 110101


    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ750
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 28J
    FRAME ID: 11M
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 050101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ750 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.

    MODEL NAME: XJ750
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 28M
    FRAME ID: 11M
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 060101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ750 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.


    COUNTRY: JAPAN

    MODEL NAME: XJ750D-II
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 38X
    FRAME ID: 5G8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 106101
    NOTE: this model features fuel injection and the same style appearance, bodywork, and wheels as the XJ650 Turbo models. Unique digital dash “Yamaha Cycle Communications System”. Front forks featured the XJ900 style anti-dive system, and the lower tubes are painted black. First production motorcycle to come factory-equipped with radial tires. VERY rare.

    MODEL NAME: XJ750E-II
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 29R
    FRAME ID: 29R
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: this model had a slightly larger (by 1cc) 749cc engine with larger valves, hotter cams, and Hitachi HSC33 series carbs, all fitted into the XJ900 frame. Anti-dive front suspension, XJ900 style fairing, bodywork, striping. Basically an XJ900RK Seca with the 750cc engine. VERY rare. Rumor has it that the engine cases in these bikes are stamped only with the model ID (29R-) and no serial number…

    MODEL NAME: XJ750
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750 Police Special
    MODEL ID CODE: 33V
    FRAME ID: 33V
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 103001
    NOTE: this model is a Police Special.

    MODEL NAME: XJ750P
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750 Police Special
    MODEL ID CODE: 39Y
    FRAME ID: 33V
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 110101
    NOTE: this model is a Police Special.


    COUNTRY: OE

    MODEL NAME: XJ750
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 5N1
    FRAME ID: 5N1
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as North American XJ750 Seca model, has dual front disc brakes and an oil cooler.

    MODEL NAME: XJ750P
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750 Police Special
    MODEL ID CODE: 37H
    FRAME ID: 37H
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: this model is a Western Australia Police Special model. White painted swingarm and steering crowns, may have used 900 cams.
    NOTE: the 1983 version had a white frame and a black frame on the 1985 models. Uses XJ900 anti-dive forks and XJ750 Maxim brake calipers


    COUNTRY: OTHER

    MODEL NAME: XJ750P
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ750 Police Special
    MODEL ID CODE: 24L
    FRAME ID: 24L
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: this model is a Police Special, New Zealand model.



    1984 XJ750 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ750ML
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ750 Midnight Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 22T
    FRAME ID: 22T
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 110101

    MODEL NAME: XJ750RL
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ750 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 44X
    FRAME ID: 44X
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: XJ750 engine in an XJ900 frame. Only 601 made for the Canadian market. Engine actually displaces 749cc (1cc larger than standard XJ750 models, which were only 748cc's) and uses a hotter exhaust cam, larger (+1,00mm) intake valves, different crankcase, cylinder jugs, and pistons/rings, the XJ900 type clutch assembly and middle gears set, as well as the strengthened 2nd gear set as used in the XJ650 Turbo, XJ750-X, and XJ900 models. Uses XJ900 forks, but no anti-dive. Similar but not quite identical to the 1984 Australia-only XJ750RL (45T model). It has been noted that all the Red/Silver XJ750RL models (Canada) seem to have black motors while the Blue/White models (Australia) have silver motors


    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ750
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: 41Y
    FRAME ID: 41Y
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: styling and features the same as XJ900 model, features the 749cc engine, and has an oil cooler.


    COUNTRY: AUSTRALIA

    MODEL NAME: XJ750RL
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ750 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 45T
    FRAME ID: 45T
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: XJ750 engine in an XJ900 frame. Only 286 made for the Australian market. Engine actually displaces 749cc (1cc larger than standard XJ750 models, which were only 748cc's) and uses a hotter exhaust cam, larger (+1,00mm) intake valves, different crankcase, cylinder jugs, and pistons/rings, the XJ900 type clutch assembly and middle gears set, as well as the strengthened 2nd gear set as used in the XJ650 Turbo, XJ750-X, and XJ900 models. Similar but not quite identical to the 1984 Canada-only XJ750RL (44X model). It has been noted that all the Red/Silver XJ750RL models (Canada) seem to have black motors while the Blue/White models (Australia) have silver motors.



    1985 XJ750 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ750XN Maxim
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ750 Maxim-X
    MODEL ID CODE: 1FL
    FRAME ID: 1FL
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    COUNTRY: Switzerland

    MODEL NAME: XJ750 Maxim
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ750
    MODEL ID CODE: unknown
    FRAME ID: 42M
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: Switzerland only. 750 engine in an XJ900 frame, bodywork and paint scheme appears identical to 1983 XJ750E-II model.



    1986 XJ750 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ750XS
    STREET NAME: 1986 XJ750 Maxim-X
    MODEL ID CODE: 1MY
    FRAME ID: 1MY
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101



    XJ900 Models

    NOTE: Although available in the North American market for only one year (1983), the XJ900 models were actually the longest-running production version of any XJ-series bike of this era, and since so many of the sales of these bikes occurred in the "overseas" markets, it is hard to gather and portray information on many of those models (since we here in the USA generally do not have access to those sources of information). However, here are some general guidelines on these bikes that may perhaps prove interesting, if not valuable:

    Most 1983-84 XJ900 models had an 853cc engine, which was later increased in size to an 891cc engine in late 1984-on. The North American XJ900RK model used the 853cc engine.

    All of the 1983 and some early 1984 XJ900RK and XJ900RL models had an anti-dive front suspension system and DeCarbon remote-canister rear shock absorbers, both of which were eliminated on the later models.

    The 1983 XJ900RK models had a fork-mounted front fairing, which was prone to cause high-speed stability problems. The 1984-later models had a new, larger frame-mounted fairing, and some models were also fitted with a front "belly pan" surrounding the lower front exhaust header pipes and engine case area.


    1983 XJ900 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ900RK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ900 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 35H
    FRAME ID: 35H
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 3,699.00
    NOTE: 853cc engine, handlebar-mounted fairing.


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ900RK
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ900 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 31E
    FRAME ID: 31E
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: 853cc engine, handlebar-mounted fairing.


    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ900F
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 31A
    FRAME ID: 31A
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: 853cc engine, handlebar-mounted fairing, belly pan.

    MODEL NAME: XJ900F
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 32F
    FRAME ID: 31A
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 030101
    NOTE: Switzerland. 853cc engine, handlebar-mounted fairing, belly pan.


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XJ900U
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 33F
    FRAME ID: 33F
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: 853cc engine, handlebar-mounted fairing.




    1984 XJ900 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ900
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 42R
    FRAME ID: 31A
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 032101
    NOTE: Switzerland. 853cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.

    MODEL NAME: XJ900
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 42N
    FRAME ID: 31A
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 034101
    NOTE: 853cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.


    COUNTRY: OTHER

    MODEL NAME: XJ900
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 48G
    FRAME ID: 31A
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 003101
    NOTE: Switzerland. 853cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XJ900RL
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ900 Seca
    MODEL ID CODE: 47L
    FRAME ID: 33F
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 001101
    NOTE: 853cc engine, frame-mounted fairing, belly pan.



    1985 XJ900 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ900
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 58L
    FRAME ID: 58L
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: Finland, Germany, Sweden, and England. 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.

    MODEL NAME: XJ900
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 1FW
    FRAME ID: 58L
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 010101
    NOTE: France. 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.

    MODEL NAME: XJ900
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 1FW
    FRAME ID: ???
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 013101
    NOTE: Denmark, Germany, Norway, Sweden. 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.

    MODEL NAME: XJ900
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 58N
    FRAME ID: 31A
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 050101
    NOTE: Switzerland. 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XJ900N
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 1FX
    FRAME ID: 1FX
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: 891cc engine, no fairing, XJ650RJ Seca style instrumentation, the big 8" round headlight, and traditional round-tube handlebars.

    MODEL NAME: XJ900FN
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 58M
    FRAME ID: 58M
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing, non-air adjustable forks, non anti-dive system, belly pan.

    MODEL NAME: XJ900Police
    STREET NAME: 1985 XJ900 Police Special
    MODEL ID CODE: 53M
    FRAME ID: 33F
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 005101
    NOTE: 853cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.



    1986 XJ900 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ900
    STREET NAME: 1986 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 1FW
    FRAME ID: 58L
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 013101
    NOTE: France. 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.



    1987 XJ900 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ900F
    STREET NAME: 1987 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 2HL
    FRAME ID: 58L
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 020101
    NOTE: Greece. 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing, non-air adjustable forks, non anti-dive system, belly pan.

    MODEL NAME: XJ900F
    STREET NAME: 1987 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 58N
    FRAME ID: 31A
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 051101
    NOTE: Switzerland. 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing, non-air adjustable forks, non anti-dive system, belly pan.


    COUNTRY: OTHER

    MODEL NAME: XJ900
    STREET NAME: 1987 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 2UR
    FRAME ID: 2UR
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XJ900T
    STREET NAME: 1987 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 2HM
    FRAME ID: 1FX
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 003101
    NOTE: 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.



    1989 XJ900 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ900
    STREET NAME: 1989 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 3NG1
    FRAME ID: 58L
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 029101
    NOTE: 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.



    1990 XJ900 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ900
    STREET NAME: 1990 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 3NG2
    FRAME ID: 58L
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 037101
    NOTE: 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.



    1991 XJ900 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ900F
    STREET NAME: 1991 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 4BB1
    FRAME ID: 4BB
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    NOTE: 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.



    1992 XJ900 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XJ900F
    STREET NAME: 1992 XJ900
    MODEL ID CODE: 4BB2
    FRAME ID: 4BB
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 008101
    NOTE: 891cc engine, frame-mounted fairing.


    NOTE: XJ900 models were sold off-and-on in other parts of the world up until 1994, and in some countries was marketed under the name of the XJ900S Diversion series of bikes.




    1100 Models

    1982 XJ1100 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XJ1100J
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ1100 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 10M
    FRAME ID: 10M
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101
    USA MSRP PRICE: $ 4,099.00


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ110MJ
    STREET NAME: 1982 XJ1100 Midnight Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 11G
    FRAME ID: 11G
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101



    1983 XJ1100 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ1100K
    STREET NAME: 1983 XJ1100 Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 11G
    FRAME ID: 11G
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 010101



    1984 XJ1100 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XJ110ML
    STREET NAME: 1984 XJ1100 Midnight Maxim
    MODEL ID CODE: 11G
    FRAME ID: 11G
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101


    NOTE: many people get the XS1100 and XJ1100 models confused.....basically, because they appear to be very similar bikes, visually. And, it's true, the XJ1100 model was drawn from the 1981 XS1100 model (which was discontinued in 1982 and replaced by the XJ1100 model). However, be aware that the XS model bikes are, in many ways, different from their XJ cousins. Here's the VIN breakdowns on the XS1100 models, so you can be sure what bike you actually have:

    1978 XS1100 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100E
    STREET NAME: 1978 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 2H7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    COUNTRY: EUROPA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100
    STREET NAME: 1978 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H9
    FRAME ID: 2H9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100
    STREET NAME: 1978 XS1100E
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H9
    FRAME ID: 2H9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 100101


    COUNTRY: OTHER

    MODEL NAME: XS1100
    STREET NAME: 1978 XS1100E
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H8
    FRAME ID: 2H8
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101



    1979 XS1100 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100F
    STREET NAME: 1979 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 2H7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 020101

    MODEL NAME: XS1100SF
    STREET NAME: 1979 XS1100 SPECIAL
    MODEL ID CODE: 3H3
    FRAME ID: 2H7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 020101


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100F
    STREET NAME: 1979 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 2H7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 110101

    MODEL NAME: XS1100SF
    STREET NAME: 1979 XS1100 SPECIAL
    MODEL ID CODE: 3H4
    FRAME ID: 3H4
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    COUNTRY: EUROPA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100
    STREET NAME: 1979 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H9
    FRAME ID: 2H9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 020101


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100
    STREET NAME: 1979 XS1100F
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H9
    FRAME ID: 2H9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 110101



    1980 XS1100 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100G
    STREET NAME: 1980 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 3H5
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XS1100SG
    STREET NAME: 1980 XS1100 SPECIAL
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 3J6
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XS1100LG
    STREET NAME: 1980 XS1100 MIDNIGHT
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 4H3
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100G
    STREET NAME: 1980 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 3U7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XS1100SG
    STREET NAME: 1980 XS1100 SPECIAL
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 3U9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    COUNTRY: EUROPA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100G
    STREET NAME: 1980 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H9
    FRAME ID: 2H7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 130101


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100G
    STREET NAME: 1980 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 3X1
    FRAME ID: 2H7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101


    COUNTRY: OTHER

    MODEL NAME: XS1100P
    STREET NAME: 1980 XS1100 Police
    MODEL ID CODE: 4H9
    FRAME ID: 2H7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000001
    NOTE: this is a Police model.



    1981 XS1100 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: USA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100H
    STREET NAME: 1981 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 4R1
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XS1100SH
    STREET NAME: 1981 XS1100 SPECIAL
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 4R0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XS1100LH
    STREET NAME: 1981 XS1100 MIDNIGHT
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 4W1
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000001


    COUNTRY: CANADA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100H
    STREET NAME: 1981 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 4T1
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XS1100SH
    STREET NAME: 1981 XS1100 SPECIAL
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 4T0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XS1100LH
    STREET NAME: 1981 XS1100 MIDNIGHT
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 4W2
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000001


    COUNTRY: EUROPE

    MODEL NAME: XS1100H
    STREET NAME: 1981 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 3X0
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101

    MODEL NAME: XS1100SH
    STREET NAME: 1981 XS1100 SPECIAL
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 5K7
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 010101


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100H
    STREET NAME: 1981 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 3X1
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 003101

    MODEL NAME: XS1100RH
    STREET NAME: 1981 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 5H5
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101



    1982 XS1100 MODELS:

    COUNTRY: EUROPA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100H
    STREET NAME: 1982 XS1100
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H9
    FRAME ID: 2H9
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 140101


    COUNTRY: OCEANIA

    MODEL NAME: XS1100P
    STREET NAME: 1982 XS1100 Police
    MODEL ID CODE: 2H7
    FRAME ID: 5H4
    SERIAL NUMBER STARTS AT: 000101



    ALL other Yamaha Models:

    http://davesbikes.weebly.com/uploads/4/8/4/5/4845046/yamaha_model_codes.pdf



    THE TEST:

    Here are a couple of real XJ bike VIN's (mostly culled from bikes listed for sale from eBay). Go ahead and identify them for what they really are.

    16G004078

    JYA1FH009FA000241

    JYA10M006CA004270

    5G2-107546

    JYA4U8004BA004890


    For extra credit, determine the missing VIN "check digit" in the following VIN's:

    JYA4H700?AA00638

    JYA5K500?CA027661

    JYA5V300?CA000432


    Anyone who got all the answers correct should stay after class and clean the erasers.



    CONCLUSIONS:

    If you're not confused yet, then you haven't studied carefully enough.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2021
  5. chacal

    chacal Moderator Moderator Supporting Vendor Premium Member

    Messages:
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    At My Computer
    SECTION A:

    INTRODUCTION:

    --The Real Costs of Maintenance


    Hint!: they arise (and rise!) from not doing things correctly in the first place!



    An Insight:

    "One of the reasons I kept this bike, even though I keep spending more and more time and money on it, is the simple fact that I will never have to take it to a mechanic. If something breaks I'll know how to fix it........if I am on a trip----I won't be at the mercy of a local repair shop (and I'd rather spend a couple hundred+ for new tools while on a trip if needed to do it myself then get ripped off).

    In my opinion, this is what makes a 'biker' and a "guy who rides motorcycles" different."


    An Observation:

    It is a common myth that people believe that because these classic bikes are inexpensive to PURCHASE, that they are also inexpensive to MAINTAIN or REPAIR. That is the wrong, wrong, wrong way to think about it; a VERY BAD idea. Thinking like that will inevitably (almost 100% guaranteed) lead to frustration and added expense.

    Among the many nice traits of these bikes is that they actually are simple enough for the average person to work on and to do repairs on SUCCESSFULLY by themselves, as they were a pretty well-engineered design (except for the fusebox!) and very durable, easy to work on.

    But "easy" doesn't mean "cheap" and if you are willing to skip steps in order to save a dollar or two, or a minute or two, then in many cases you're going to be doing that old Fram oil filter commercial thing: "you can pay me now, or you can pay me later". And that "future payment" is going to involve a lack of performance and more time and effort on your part until you eventually just give up, or buckle down and do things right.

    The rule of thumb in the boating or aviation world is this: whatever you paid for the vehicle, expect to spend 10-20% PER YEAR of that purchase price in maintenance costs. Just because you could "afford" to buy the vehicle doesn't mean that you can "afford" the yearly preventative and service maintenance costs; and if not, well, then eventually you learn quickly why people say that a boat is just "a hole in the water that you throw money into". That's not really true, but that's what people who don't understand that on-going PROPER maintenance and repair costs need to be factored in when determining the real "price" of a bike, especially an older one which is going to require not just the normal on-going maintenance costs, but most probably also additional costs to make up for the previous owner(s) lack of proper maintenance.

    The issue that arises with older vehicles is that the purchase price is quite low. That's a blessing, in some ways; but in other ways, that's bad because it lulls people into the belief that the maintenance "costs" (time AND money) will be cheap too. A MUCH BETTER WAY to understand it, I believe, is like this: IF your 1982 XJ650 Seca could be purchased BRAND NEW, today, the price would be $X (let's say, $8,000 ?). THEREFORE YOU SHOULD REALISTICALLY EXPECT THE AVERAGE ANNUAL MAINTENANCE COSTS WILL BE $ 800 - $ 1,500 PER YEAR.

    And never mind that maybe you get "free oil changes and service/maintenance" as part of a new-vehicle "warranty"---you PAID for those "free" maintenance costs in the purchase price of the bike, rather than in smaller chunks on down the road. In fact, "free" service warranties are really just a way of allowing a new vehicle purchaser of FINANCING those service and maintenance costs into the purchase price, rather than paying cash every 6 months for those maintenance and service fees.

    And many (most?) OEM vehicle sellers make more money off their customers from those financing charges (assuming a purchaser finances through the OEM financing program, which most people do) than they make off building the vehicles! THAT'S why they offer the "free" service to you, so they can build up that purchase price, and thus financing fees, by "hiding" the 10-20% additional yearly costs into the purchase price. This gives people the completely wrong ideas and understanding about what the true, REAL costs of vehicle ownership are.

    On used vehicles with no "free" warranty, those service and maintenance costs become very real, very quickly.

    I understand and appreciate that some people are going to wildly disagree with me on the above statements, and that's cool. And since I offer parts for sale (for these bikes), many will say that I'm just trying to push people into spending needless amounts of money. Well, that's one possibility.

    The other one is that the OEM engineers and manufacturers and experienced (honest) mechanics will also tell you pretty much exactly what I'm portraying here: doing things right actually saves you time and money in the long run, and that all complex mechanical objects (from your lawnmower on up) requires periodic, proper maintenance if you expect it to perform to the level it was designed to perform to, and have the life expectancy that it was designed for. These things aren't magic. They aren't due to luck. Having a bike perform properly is not akin to winning the lottery, i.e. some people get lucky and others don't and that's just life. If you dig deep, if you could stand over the shoulder of those who are successful and those who aren't, the ways in which success is determined are pretty clear-cut and straight-forward, as outlined above.

    As are, unfortunately, the ways in which a lack of success are achieved.


    A Great Question:

    "Let me ask for your unbiased opinion.

    Based on my calculations, I am looking at sinking $1000+ in this bike to get it in great shape. since you are very familiar with these bikes do you think it is worthwhile? I am torn, I am looking for a nice starter bike and this bike seems to fit that bill. I don't think I could get a nice bike for that price. If I did I would probably be looking at doing some of the same things that I need on this bike. Carb tune etc. My concern is that I spend 1000 now and then something else goes and then I am sinking another grand later.

    Let me know what you think."


    A Serious Answer:

    Like you noted, you'll have to spend a bit of $$ now to both make up for previous owner's neglect, and also to acquire a lot of the tools needed to perform some of the tasks. The tool expenses will, of course, not repeat, but parts costs on older machines can and will be a factor. So you're looking at spending a significant amount of money up front, and with hopefully reduced amounts going forward into the future.

    Of course, they are very nice starter bikes in the sense that they are relatively easy to ride and to work on, something that later model bikes can't always lay claim to. Plus you're going to learn A LOT about working on bikes with one of these! There's no real economic "value" to that besides satisfaction and knowledge and the ability to maintain/tune/etc. your bike in the future, which again goes further towards reducing the maintenance costs of the bike in the future.

    Is it worth it? From a "can I sell it at a profit stand-point in a few months?" perspective, the answer is: probably not. Although the prices of the bikes continue to escalate, parts and labor costs to put one of these into tip-top shape almost never get recouped upon resale.

    Hope these insights help with your decision making. They are great little bikes.
     
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