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Gasket dressing on Clutch and Shifter covers

Discussion in 'XJ Technical Chat' started by Calvert, Jan 6, 2019.

  1. Calvert

    Calvert New Member

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    I have a complete paper engine gasket kit for my 1982 XJ650J. Wondering if I need to dress the gaskets or if just dry is fine. Dry seems to work fine on my carb bowls. Also there are some internal gaskets on the shifter/ crankcase breather cover. Should those be dressed? Gurus please advise.
     

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  2. XJOE550

    XJOE550 Active Member

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    I'm sure dry is fine if the gaskets are good quality. I have had success with copper spray. Sprays on and becomes tacky. Good for keeping the gasket in place during installation as well.

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Calvert

    Calvert New Member

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    I used this on my intake gaskets, between the rubber boots and the engine. I prefer dry because it's less messy and less effort. Just don't want to have to undo/redo any work and do things right there first time.
     

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  4. Calvert

    Calvert New Member

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    Cover was also leaking a bit on the shifter shaft seal. I assume I can get a replacement from xj4ever unless there was an o-ring or something I missed.

    20190106_130933.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2019
  5. StahlMaster

    StahlMaster Member

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    My XJ650J also leaked at the shifter. Common seal that can be had from your local Yamaha dealer.
     
  6. jayrodoh

    jayrodoh YimYam Premium Member

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    Dry is fine, I’m two years since replacing all mine and no leaks. Yes Chacal has that seal.
     
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  7. cds1984

    cds1984 Active Member

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    +1 for dry. Then you can just swear at the guy who used gunk that you have to get off, without damaging the gasket surface, first.
     
  8. XJOE550

    XJOE550 Active Member

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    I think you have it backwards. The reason I used the copper spray among other options when I last time I had one of my engines broken down was because I spent hours scrapping and using solvents to take the old gaskets off. I was determined to find a clean option which will make it easier to take off gaskets when disassembling the motor. I got a lot of opinions from members (different bike and site). So when I put the motor back together I used different options in order to experiment. I used a light film of waterproof grease on base gasket (the guy that uses this technique builds drag bikes), went dry with the head gasket (it is now leaking after two years), used copper spray on the oil pan, case covers and valve cover gasket. I have only since taken off and put on the valve cover gasket and have found it very easy to do. I will have to go in and take off the head in order to fix the small oil leak. Although I believe in my case the main cause was due to the cam tunnel seal, I will be using the copper spray on the head gasket this time.

    Once again, I was told the copper spray would help keep the gasket from getting stuck and not the opposite. From my experience with the valve cover gasket so far, it seems to have been proven true. Dry is fine with good quality gaskets. But if you are not sure the copper spray helps and it helps in the removal process.
     
  9. Polock

    Polock Well-Known Member

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  10. cds1984

    cds1984 Active Member

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    XJOE550 - Oops I was actually thinking about the low pressure gaskets more than the compression area. You are right when I do a head gasket I coat it in hi-temp aluminium coloured paint first, which seems to work a charm.
    My +1 was for the clutch cover, sump,gear change cover, cylinder to base and not the valve cover,head gasket. But... to be fair, this thread is about the clutch and gear change covers.

    Polock, what is it like to get off when you have to?
     
  11. XJ550H

    XJ550H Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Matti where are you???
     
  12. Polock

    Polock Well-Known Member

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    wooden stick and a rag with lacquer thinner on one side, there's no need to take it off both sides. any squeeze out, use the stick and rag.
     
  13. cds1984

    cds1984 Active Member

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    Nice! I like the sound of that.
     

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