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To Rebuild or Not to Rebuild

Discussion in 'XJ DIY How-To Videos' started by Joshua Olkowski, Aug 2, 2018.

  1. k-moe

    k-moe Pie, Bacon, Bourbon. Moderator Premium Member

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    How you adjust the clutch cable matters.
    Clutch Adjustment & Clutch Cable Replacement Procedure

    Having said that, I agree about perhaps needing new friction plates.
    One simple test is to get on the highway in fifth, then shift down to third as if you were going to pass a car. Any clutch slippage will become quite obvious at that point.
    Do that test after adjusting the cable.

    If there is no slippage of the clutch, and the cable adjustment does not remedy the engagement problem, then you most likely need a new clutch cable. They do stretch a bit, and a bit is enough to keep the clutch from fully disengaging.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2019
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  2. Joshua Olkowski

    Joshua Olkowski Member

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    I changed the oil and adjusted the cable on a cold bike to 3mm free play as per the manual. It works fine now. It may have been a combination of bad oil and not enough free play.

    On a different note. How do I get this thing OUT!!!!
    This is the left crankcase flange oil seal. As you can see I have made attempts at trying to pry it out with no success. I tried screwing in a wood screw and then yanking it out and it is in there tight! Can anybody give me some helpful hints on how to get this seal out. thanks
     

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  3. k-moe

    k-moe Pie, Bacon, Bourbon. Moderator Premium Member

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    You will need to very carefully cut a wedge out of the steel part of the seal (a Dremel tool or smilar), and use a chisel to very carefully curl the seal to a smaller daiameter so it can be removed.
    There may be other methods that someone else can chime in on.
     
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  4. Joshua Olkowski

    Joshua Olkowski Member

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    That's exactly what I did and that got it out. The very carefully part is in question, however. I actually just used a nail and hammer to start a hole, then used a flat head screw driver and hammer and made an incision into it. That was able to collapse the seal just enough that I could pull it out with brute force.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
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  5. Joshua Olkowski

    Joshua Olkowski Member

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    I'm not sure who decides to delete threads but I wanted to start a thread about this since there is almost no information regarding how to do this procedure on here and the next person who has to do this could find it easier on this site. Maybe I should've explained that before. Just an fyi.
     
  6. k-moe

    k-moe Pie, Bacon, Bourbon. Moderator Premium Member

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    If you can do a writeup in the DYI section that would be appreciated. Include photos or drawings if you can.

    I deleted your post as it seemed to be asking the same question as you were asking here.
     
  7. Joshua Olkowski

    Joshua Olkowski Member

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    So, I filled my tank up the other day and I accidentally filled it up almost to the brim. Not thinking anything of it, I quickly returned home and parked my bike outside, covered it and that was that. A couple days later I go to ride and the new paint job has been destroyed. Looks like gas somehow oozed out. It's been 90+ degree heat outside. I should also mention that I put a new gas cap on it and it's very hard to put on. Meaning, I really have to press down hard before the key will turn back to secure the cap. I'm wondering if the heat and putting too much gas in the tank made the gas ooze out? How the hell did this happen?
     

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  8. XJ550H

    XJ550H Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    fuel expands when heated
     
  9. Joshua Olkowski

    Joshua Olkowski Member

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    Would this have been avoided if the tank were only half full?
     
  10. k-moe

    k-moe Pie, Bacon, Bourbon. Moderator Premium Member

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    It would have been avoided if you had stopped filling the tank when the fuel was even with the bottom of the collar inside of the filler neck.
    I wonder if the gas cap vent might not be blocked.
    Your Gas Cap and You
     
  11. Joshua Olkowski

    Joshua Olkowski Member

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    I guess another question to ask is if it is bad to park the bike in extreme heat or not regardless of my tank situation. Can prolonged exposure to heat destroy a bike pretty quickly or does it matter?
    Yeah, I kind of ignored my spidey sense when I started filling the tank so much. Should have just went out and put 15 more miles on the bike before I went home.
     
  12. k-moe

    k-moe Pie, Bacon, Bourbon. Moderator Premium Member

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    Heat is a factor in aging (hardening) rubber parts, as is UV exposure. The reality is that if you want to enjoy riding you just have to park outisde in the heat sometimes. Not anything to fret over. Just be sure to follow the maintainance schedule.
     
  13. Joshua Olkowski

    Joshua Olkowski Member

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    Word
     
  14. Joshua Olkowski

    Joshua Olkowski Member

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    Help! New fork seal still leaks.
    I attempted to change my fork seals and the job seemed pretty straightforward, however, the same exact fork still leaks. Any ideas why this might have happened?
     
  15. Timbox

    Timbox Well-Known Member

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    Do you have any pics of the fork tubes? Any pitting close to the wiper? What did you use to put the bottom whipper in? As you slid the fork tube in did you have a little lube on it?
     
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  16. Joshua Olkowski

    Joshua Olkowski Member

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    I think I might know what the issue is. As you see in the pic there are nicks on the chrome that go into the lower shock. However, when I took it apart there were no visible tears in the seal itself. In any case, are these salvageable or do I need new forks?
     

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  17. k-moe

    k-moe Pie, Bacon, Bourbon. Moderator Premium Member

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    Salvageable, but it'll take a bit of patience and work.
    You'll need to use wet-and-dry paper to poilsh out as much of the pitting as you can without reducing the dimeter significantly. Use a dental pic to clean the rust out of the pits. Degrease the tube thoroughly, and then use a good 2-part epoxy to fill the pits and allow it to cure. Then follow-up with wet-and-dry paper again (wet this time). I start with 600 and progressively move up to 2000.

    That's the economy way, and will last for many years.
    The proper way is to sent them out to be filled, ground and rechromed. That costs a bit more.
     
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  18. Joshua Olkowski

    Joshua Olkowski Member

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    I started to have a small idling problem with my Seca 550. Assuming the bike is warmed up and have been riding for a while, if I pull up to a stop light and let it idle in neutral, after about 10 seconds it SLOWLY starts to sputter out. Giving it a little choke does sustain the idle, however. I'm wondering if the carbs could be a little gummed up and I might need to run a little Berrymans through them? Any other thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019
  19. XJ550H

    XJ550H Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    you should adjust idle after riding for 10 miles or so.

    it does sound like the pilot jets circuit is
     
  20. Joshua Olkowski

    Joshua Olkowski Member

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    Will do. I'm curious if the heat has an effect on the idle as it's been very hot lately.
     

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